So you think you know Gin? You might think of yourself as a bit of a Gin-fanatic; know your Old Tom from your London Dry, your Martini from your Martinez, or perhaps you have a very respectable Gin collection at home? But if you really want to impress with your Gin knowledge, then keep on reading.


We’ve rounded up the best glassware for all of your favourite Gin drinks, because let’s be honest, presentation is almost as important as the drink itself – why do you think there are so many #cocktails on Instagram?

First up, there’s no wrong way to drink Gin, but there’s definitely the best way, and that means using the right glassware. As well as looking fancy, the right glass is designed to make your drink even better; from stemmed glasses which mean the heat from your hand won’t warm the drink, to the shape of the rim to contain the drink’s aromas.
 

Let’s Start with the Classic - Highball Glass

Best used for long drinks, the Highball glass usually holds 12 fl. oz., so it’s perfect for mixed drinks such as a Tom Collins, or a Gin and Tonic. You could use a Highball for a Punch too, although many bars will serve a Punch in a dedicated cup with handle.

Gin cocktail in a Highball glass


Designed to serve up tipples containing lots of ice and non-alcoholic mixer.
+ Because they’re tall and narrow, a Highball glass will keep your tipple cool and carbonated.

Size: A Highball glass can contain 240 to 350 ml.

Highball is also the name of a wonderfully versatile cocktail with lots of flavors, but if your are more keen to sticking to the Gin, here are some fantastic alternatives to G&T to tickle your tastebuds and make your forays into Gin far more adventurous. 
 

Want to Impress with Your G&Ts? Use a Copa Glass!

To make your G&Ts a bit more special, consider using copa glasses. There are often called balloon glasses, due to their shape, but the name ‘copa’ comes from the Spanish word for ‘glass’ and it was in fact the Spanish who started the trend of serving a Gin and Tonic in this way.

The copa glass has a long stem, and the large, rounded shape means it can hold lots of ice, as well as a big garnish. It narrows towards the top, so the aromas of the Gin and garnishes stay contained within the glass, and when you take a sip, you get the full hit of the juniper smell.

Copa glass - loaded with ice ... and gin.

Load up your copa with ice – and don’t be shy here. You want it almost full with cubed ice, as anything less will just melt and water down your drink. Next, add your Gin of choice (for a truly authentic taste of Spain, try Gin Mare), along with your garnish (citrus peels, sprigs of rosemary, juniper berries) and top with your favourite tonic. Relax, and imagine you’re on the Spanish coast.

+ A long stem prevents your hand from warming the tipple and melting the ice.
+ More room for garnishes and ice, which means your drink stays cooler for longer
+ The wide brim of the glass allows you to appreciate the fragrance and flavors of your G&T 

Size: It is anything from 600ml to 800ml in size.

Learn how to make the perfect G&T in your copa glass with these simple tips and tricks. 

Are you thirsty for more knowledge and wonder how Gin and Tonic was Invented? Here's the answer!
 

Prefer Your Gin Neat? No Problem with a Tumbler!

Get yourself a tumbler and serve it near, or on the rocks. Tumblers should be short and fairly wide glasses, but the term’s often used to describe any heavy-bottomed glass. You may also hear a tumbler referred to as a rocks glass. The likelihood is, if you’re drinking neat Gin, you won’t be drinking more than a measure or two at a time, so a big glass isn’t necessary.
 


+ The wide mouth and thick base of a rocks glass is ideal for muddling ingredients.
+  Big enough to fit in plenty of ice, or even an oversized ice cube 

Size: It is usually 350-400ml in size.
 

Iconic Martini Glass for a Special Experience

Want something more specialist? You got it. Let’s start with the iconic Martini glass, which is technically called a cocktail glass, but the two are often used interchangeably. In actual fact, the cocktail glass is usually slightly smaller.

The Martini glass was formally introduced in 1925 as a modern take on the Champagne coupe glass (or Champagne bowl, as it’s often called).

Did you know Martini is basically Gin and Dry Vermouth?

The wide brim of the glass allows the Gin – the main ingredient in a Martini – to release more of its aroma due to the larger surface area.

These days, you’ll find most variations of a Martini served in this glass, and they’re named after the glass itself because most have very little in common with a traditional Martini, which is simply Gin and Dry Vermouth.

+ The V-shape of the Martini glass helps stop different elements in the drink from separating.
+ A wide brim helps lift the tipple’s aromas to the drinker’s nose. 
+ Designed to keep your tipple at the right temperature.

Size: It is usually 350-400ml in size.
 

Feel Everlasting and Elegant with a Coupe Glass

If, like me, after 3 Martinis you’re likely to start spilling them, you might feel safer with a coupe glass. It’s a long stemmed glass, similar to the Martini glass, with a curved rim. Supposedly modelled on Marie Antoinette’s breast, it’s a classic, elegant cocktail glass which would be right at home in any home bar.

After 3 Martinis, a coupe glass seems a safer option

+ Coupe glasses share all the advantages of the Martini glass (see above), with the added bonus that they are sturdier, so it’s not so easy to spill your drink!

Size: They are usually 150-210 ml in size.


What's your favorite Gin glass? Share with us in the comments below.

By the way, Flaviar offers amazing Gin-themed subscription boxes, including premium and rare brands. Perfect for true connoisseurs of the juniper spirit! Moreover, if you are worried about your expenses, check out our selection of best Gins under $50.