Yellowstone Select Bourbon
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Limestone Branch
  • Age NAS
  • Style Straigt Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 46.5%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • caramel
  • dried cherry
  • peanut
  • orange zest
  • herbs
  • roasted hazelnuts
  • bread
  • roasted
  • rye

Yellowstone

Select Bourbon (0.75l, 46.5%)
Price $45.99

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Character Goatson
A rich and flavorful blend of four Bourbons from a legendary family.

What would happen if the descendants of the legendary Beam family got the itch to reenter the distilling business? This is what would happen… meet Limestone Branch Distillery. Steve and Paul Beam launched their fledgling distillery and released their first super-premium Spirits in 2015. The initial results were so promising, that industry giant Luxco bought a 50% stake to provide distribution and expansion capital. So far their line-up contains three gold-medal-winning Whiskies and they are just getting started.

The first Yellowstone brand Whiskey was created by Taylor & Williams in the late 1800s. The brand changed hands many times over the years, but most recently arrived at Luxco — who has partnered with Limestone Branch to revitalize the brand. And it makes sense because Steve and Paul’s great-granduncle was the original distiller for the brand back in the day.

Yellowstone Select Bourbon is a blend of four sourced Kentucky Bourbons — selected for taste and balance — and bottled at a perfect and flavorful 46.5% ABV. In just a few short years it has already won four gold and silver medals. 

Smartass Corner:
The original Yellowstone Whiskey was distilled in a log-still. It was basically a hallowed-out log filled with copper pipe that was used for primary distillation.
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Limestone Branch
  • Age NAS
  • Style Straigt Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 46.5%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Roasted chestnut

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma has a dash of Rye spice with banana, dried cherry, caramel, herbs, licorice, and brown butter.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
There’s more rich toffee on the palate with roasted hazelnuts, peanut brittle, flamed orange zest, and toasted sourdough bread.

Finish
The finish is medium-long and sweet with note of clove. 
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Yellowstone Select Bourbon taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Yellowstone Select Bourbon and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • caramel
  • dried cherry
  • peanut
  • orange zest
  • herbs
  • roasted hazelnuts
  • bread
  • roasted
  • rye
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon matures quicker than Scotch due to higher temperatures in American warehouses.
Bourbon was declared "The Official Spirit of America" by an Act of Congress signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon matures quicker than Scotch due to higher temperatures in American warehouses.
Bourbon was declared "The Official Spirit of America" by an Act of Congress signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964.
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