Peloton de la Muerte Espadin Mezcal
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • earthy
  • lime
  • zesty
  • grassy
  • smoky
  • spicy
  • kiwi
  • anise
  • black pepper

Pelotón de la Muerte

Peloton de la Muerte Espadin Mezcal (0.75l, 41%)
Price $33.99

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Character Goatson

This 100% Maguey Espadin Joven Mezcal is as authentic as you can get with an earthy, vegetative profile.

Peloton de la Muerte is another Mezcal-icious brainchild of Danny Mena. He started a single boutique bar in 2005 — the only establishment focused exclusively on artisanal Mezcal in Mexico City. In 2007 they opened a similar bar in New York called "Hecho en Dumbo." From there it was a small step to acquiring and independently bottling the Mexican Spirits they love. Pelotón de la Meurte is a sub-brand of his Mezcals de Leyenda artisanal Mezcals — bringing his total to nine rare, small batch Spirits.

Peloton de la Muerte are focused on the Spirit of Mezcal. So when they do a release, they provide a lot of information — which, as Spirits nerds, we can’t get enough of. For Peloton de la Muerte Espadin Mezcal, the 100% Maguey Espadin agave is slow roasted for five days in a conical pit lined with lava rock. The roasted piñas are crushed with a stone tahona before naturally fermenting in the open air for four days. It is double distilled in small-batch (two-hundred liter) copper pots. The entire process takes place in an artisanal distillery in Tlacolula, Oaxaca. This Joven Mezcal is bottled at 41% ABV.

Smartass Corner:
In Spanish the word "Pelotón" means "platoon" or "squad." So, "Pelotón de la Muerte" means "Death Squad" and refers to an ad-hoc army assembled to avenge the brutal execution of a local priest and the desecration of his remains.

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma has a dash of lime zest at first, blooming into earthy notes of summer grass and smoke.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The palate leans into the smoky, lightly spiced tone with a tart notes of kiwi, black peppercorns, and anise.

Finish
The finish is medium-length and a bit dry with a hint of smoke lingering in the throat. 

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Peloton de la Muerte Espadin Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Peloton de la Muerte Espadin Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • earthy
  • lime
  • zesty
  • grassy
  • smoky
  • spicy
  • kiwi
  • anise
  • black pepper
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
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