Kimo Sabe Joven Albedo Mezcal
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery Oaxaca Sourced
  • Style Joven Albedo Agave Mezcal
  • Alcohol 43%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • smoky
  • agave
  • citrus
  • roasted
  • black pepper
  • lemon peel
  • spicy notes
  • gently sweet
  • orange peel

Kimo Sabe

Joven Albedo Mezcal (0.7l, 43%)
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Character Goatson
A faithful friend promising bright future.

If you're old enough and remember the original of The Lone Ranger, kemo sabe means "faithful friend", but if you're younger you probably think it's "wrong brother" (thanks a lot, Johnny Depp). This Mezcal is made by a father-daughter team of Jim and Ashley Walsh and they decided to create the sweetest and most flavorful Mezcal and they do it by using non-traditional methods: first they distil it thrice (twice in steel and once in copper stills) and then they use high-tech sound wave technology to homogenize the molecules in the Spirit. We don't know what that means, but Spock might like it.

Kimo Sabe is unaged, crystal clear in color and bottled directly out of the still. It's also "albedo", which means whiteness in Latin and it represents a clean slate and an absence of color. 

Kimo Sabe gets its variety of Agave from eleven regions of Mexico and they aim to create a Mezcal with less smoky characteristics and more flavor. It's a softer style of Mezcal with medium body and chocolate overtones. It may feel a bit subdued for those used to stronger flavors, but its sweetness will convince many.
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery Oaxaca Sourced
  • Style Joven Albedo Agave Mezcal
  • Alcohol 43%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear. 

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Fresh grass, roasted pepper and...chipotle! 

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Chocolate, lemon and chamomile. 

Finish
Smooth and pepery agave.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Kimo Sabe Joven Albedo Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Kimo Sabe Joven Albedo Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • smoky
  • agave
  • citrus
  • roasted
  • black pepper
  • lemon peel
  • spicy notes
  • gently sweet
  • orange peel
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
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