Casino Azul Grand Añejo Tequila Rifle
  • Category Tequila
  • Style Añejo Tequila
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Casino Azul

Grand Añejo Tequila Rifle (1.75l, 40%)
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Character Goatson

Here we have a delicious Añejo Tequila that would severely change the outcome of The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly standoff. For the good? For the bad? Or would it turn ugly? That's for you to discover.

Bottled in a golden 1.75 L (0.46 gal) rifle container and packaged in a gold briefcase, this 100% Blue Agave juice from Selecto distillery in Amatitan is a statement piece unlike any other. Does it shoot? Of course not, but it does give you a chance to fire shots upon shots of fine leather and vanilla-tasting liquid. And it looks absolutely stunning on top of your shelf.


*This bottle is a collector’s item; we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders are limited to one item per person, as we wish to allow everyone to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

  • Category Tequila
  • Style Añejo Tequila
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
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