Russell's Reserve 2002 Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Wild Turkey
  • Style Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 57.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Wild Turkey

Russell's Reserve 2002 Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey (0.75l, 57.3%)

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Character Goatson

Wild Turkey. The iconic father-son duo of Jimmy and Eddie Russell. These are the names that mean something to everybody who knows a thing or two about Whiskey. Making Whiskey for everybody, the beginners and savvy aficionados alike, the bottling before you will be perhaps more appreciated by the latter.

A vintage-dated Kentucky Straight Bourbon, this Whiskey is drawn from the 25 barrels that were distilled in 2002 and selected by Eddie Russell. After the Whiskey sat in newly charred American oak barrels for 15 years, it clocks in at 114.6 proof. This very limited bottling was released in 2018. Starting out sweet and turning into a spicy, big, and delightful sipper with flavors of leather, maple, and honeysuckle, we wish there was more of this one out there.


*This bottle is a collector’s item; we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders are limited to one item per person, as we wish to allow everyone to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Wild Turkey
  • Style Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 57.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
During the fire of 2000, more than 900,000 gallons of Whiskey caught fire and spilled, setting a local forest on fire, poisoning a local stream, and saturating local limestone deposits with flaming alcohol, causing them to explode.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon must be made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
Bourbons have very prominent notes of vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
During the fire of 2000, more than 900,000 gallons of Whiskey caught fire and spilled, setting a local forest on fire, poisoning a local stream, and saturating local limestone deposits with flaming alcohol, causing them to explode.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon must be made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.
Bourbons have very prominent notes of vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
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