Two James Nain Rouge Absinthe Verte
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Detroit
  • Distillery Two James
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 60%*
*please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Two James

Nain Rouge Absinthe Verte (0.75l, 60%*) *please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary

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Character Goatson

A wickedly green delight that gives you a taste of Detroit's sinister past.

The name behind Two James gives a shout-out to two legendary fellas who lived life like it was golden, leaving a legacy of love and laughter in their wake. Situated in the historic hood of Corktown, Detroit, Two James opened its doors in 2012 as the city's first distillery since the Prohibition era (AKA the "No-Fun Time"). When founder and local boy David Landrum opened up shop, Detroit was just a shadow of its current self — but he saw the hidden spark and decided to fan the flames, birthing the community-driven gem that is Two James. Their cocktail menu is always crafted by a talented crew who have a finger in every drop, whipping up their own unique recipes. Not only do they serve up premium Spirits, but they're also eco-friendly, supporting local farmers, protecting the planet, and powering their operations with clean energy.

Their Nain Rouge Absinthe Verte is a liquid tribute to Detroit's colorful past. This devilishly delicious drink pays homage to the city's founder, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, who tangled with the Nain Rouge (also known as the Demon of the Strait) and suffered the consequences. Let's just say imprisonment, impoverishment, and other unpleasantries were on the menu. But, enough about Antoine, let’s talk about their Absinthe now. It's crafted with love and devotion to tradition, using a recipe straight from the 19th-century French playbook, and packed with over 100 pounds of botanicals, including wormwood, fennel, and green anise. With a five-day maceration process, this 120-proof beauty boasts bold botanical flavors, starting with a burst of anise and ending with a smooth minty finish.

  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Detroit
  • Distillery Two James
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 60%*
*please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Earthy green.

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Vegetal and floral, with a tinge of peppermint.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Floral and botanical, with prominent flavors of anise, fennel, and coriander.

Finish
Easy, smooth, and minty.

Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
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