Tequila Cabeza Blanco
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery El Ranchito
  • Age NAS
  • Style Tequila Blanco
  • Alcohol 43%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • herbs
  • pepper
  • olive
  • earthy
  • nutty
  • mineral
  • chili
  • honey
  • grassy

Tequila Cabeza

Blanco (0.75l, 43%)
Price $29.99

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Character Goatson
A meticulously-crafted Blanco Tequila from a five-generation estate producer in the Jalisco Highlands.

Five generations of the Vivanco Family have worked the land growing crops and agave in Arandas, Jalisco, Mexico. They built their own distillery in 1990 that they have affectionately named "Mi Ranchito" and released their first house-Tequila in 1994. They control every aspect of production. They own the farms, harvest the agave, produce the Spirit, and age and bottle it on site — making Mi Ranchito a true estate producer of high-quality Tequilas.

Tequila Cabeza Blanco is a special Joven Spirit. First, the piñas are harvested when the weather gets cool so that fermentation can occur in the winter months. This is important because the cool air at high altitude allows the natural fermentation to occur slowly — building more flavor. The Spirit is distilled twice in two separate copper pot stills. After the first distillation, the low Wine (ordinario) emerges at 20-22% ABV. The Spirit is then filtered a single time before being distilled a second time to ~55% ABV. No additional filtration occurs and it is brought to proof and bottled at 43% ABV. It’s one of the most flavorful un-aged Tequilas we’ve ever tasted.
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery El Ranchito
  • Age NAS
  • Style Tequila Blanco
  • Alcohol 43%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma is full and organic with roasted herbs, green peppers, Kalamata olives, and earthy notes.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The palate is fresh thick with notes of mown fields, raw nuts, mineral water, ancho chili paste, and a hint of wild honey in the background.

Finish
The finish is long for a Joven Tequila with roasted nuts and cracked peppercorns.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Tequila Cabeza Blanco taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Tequila Cabeza Blanco and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • herbs
  • pepper
  • olive
  • earthy
  • nutty
  • mineral
  • chili
  • honey
  • grassy
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila is like Champagne or Cognac. It has a Denomination of Origin, meaning it can only be produced in the Jalisco State, Mexico.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila is like Champagne or Cognac. It has a Denomination of Origin, meaning it can only be produced in the Jalisco State, Mexico.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
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