Tequila Cabal Añejo (Gold Label) Limited Edition
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • nutty
  • caramel
  • fruit
  • agave
  • spicy
  • citrus
  • oak
  • sweet
  • woody

Tequila Cabal

Añejo (Gold Label) Limited Edition (0.75l, 40%)
Price $80.98

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Character Goatson
The final destination of the fruity Blanco ― a well-aged Añejo Tequila. 

Cabal, stemming from the Spanish word "caballero" or "gentleman", is something that can't be bought. Like class, it's earned, say the folks at Tequila Cabal. They've been earning it since 1911, tending their agave fields in Amatitan, treating each plant with the utmost care and respect. It's there, in the Los Altos de Jalisco, Mexico, that they harvest some of the finest piñas or hearts, pouring their love into the land under the watchful eye of Maestro Jimador Eduardo S. Lara. More than a century of tradition over there can only translate into one thing: utterly delicious Tequila, done the right way.

Built in 1911, the 32-ton brick oven is a remnant of days past and another reminder of the tradition behind Tequila Cabal. The piñas are cooked for 42 hours, before being naturally fermented for 3 days. Then Maestro Tequilero Alvaro Montes distills the juice twice using a 5-tank distillation process. Afterwards, the fruity and herbal Tequila goes into American white oak barrels for 18 months, letting the oak work its magic in an environment with controlled light and temperature. The resulting liquid is a testament to the art of the Jimadores and Tequileros ― one that has developed from centuries of tradition and love for the land. 
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Rich Golden 

Nose / Aroma / Smell 
The 18 months in American oak are immediately apparent on the nose with rich nutty and caramel notes. The fruity cooked agave and spice are just as prominent. 

Flavor / Taste / Palate 
It's bold yet smooth on the palate with that signature agave sweetness, fruitiness, and a touch of citrus. The oaky woodiness is ever present, making it a layered sipper. 

Finish 
Finishes silky smooth with a lingering sweetness and oak. 
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Tequila Cabal Añejo (Gold Label) Limited Edition taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Tequila Cabal Añejo (Gold Label) Limited Edition and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • nutty
  • caramel
  • fruit
  • agave
  • spicy
  • citrus
  • oak
  • sweet
  • woody
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
from From the flaviar times