St. George Absinthe Verte
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region California
  • Distillery St. George
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 60%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • wormwood
  • anise
  • lemon
  • herbs
  • liquorice
  • pepper
  • earthy
  • rosemary
  • mint

St. George

Absinthe Verte (0.7l, 60%)
Oooops. This bottle is not available yet.
Add it to your wishlist and we will let you know once we get it.

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson
You'll be growing hair and not cutting ears after this one.

St. George Distillery of Alameda, California, has for been producing craft spirits for the past 32 years. They’re among the first in the United States to start the whole craft movement - that’s before craft was even a buzzword. They started as a one-man operation located in a bare-bones production facility all those years ago, and have now grown to a diverse team of individuals passionate about artisan spirits, with a 65,000-squre-foot hangar with a spectacular tasting room, laboratory, and a lineup of the most beautiful pot stills in the industry. They’re not into the whole craft movement, nor Big brands vs. Small brands. They don’t care about all that. They just wanna make f*cking great spirits. That’s it. Better is better, they say.

St. George Absinthe Verte is the first legal Absinthe produced on the soil of the United States. It took master distiller Lance Winters about 11 years to perfect the formula for this wormwood monster—meaning they were working on it way before the ban on Absinthe was lifted, which was perfectly legal though. Absinthe Verte is made by infusing Brandy with the unholy trinity of wormwood, fennel, and star anise. This infusion is then distilled in 1.500-litre copper pot stills. After the distillation the fellows at St. George perform a secondary infusion of mint, tarragon, opal basil, lemon balm, hyssop, meadowsweet, and stinging nettles. This gives their Absinthe its signatory colour. Highly acclaimed Absinthe, worthy of a neat sip, or in cocktails. Whatever you prefer. 

  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region California
  • Distillery St. George
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 60%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Colour
Dark green. 

Smell / Nose / Aroma
Rosemary, anise and a mix of herbs.

Flavour / Taste / Palate
Basil, anise, licorice, sweet lemon, wormwood bitterness, pepper, grassy

Finish
Hits-the-head.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does St. George Absinthe Verte taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in St. George Absinthe Verte and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • wormwood
  • anise
  • lemon
  • herbs
  • liquorice
  • pepper
  • earthy
  • rosemary
  • mint
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Lance Winters, Master Distiller at St. George Spirits, got his job by turning up with a bottle of home-made Whiskey as his CV.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Lance Winters, Master Distiller at St. George Spirits, got his job by turning up with a bottle of home-made Whiskey as his CV.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
from