Salcombe Gin 'Start Point'
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • citrus
  • floral
  • zesty
  • pine
  • savoury
  • fragrant
  • botanicals
  • cardamom
  • chamomile

Salcombe Gin

'Start Point' (0.75l, 44%)
Price $41.99

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Character Goatson
A bright and fresh Gin born of a trading port’s history in fruits and spices.

Howard Davies and Angus Lugsdin met at a local sailing club in Devon, UK. They shared a love of boating and would share "Sundowner" cocktails at the end of the day overlooking the sea in the town of Salcombe. In 2014 they decided to start a Spirits business together and they started construction in 2015, opening their Salcombe Gin facility in 2016 with a sixty-liter still. Now operating a four-hundred and fifty liter production still, they have developed a selection of five Gins and one Rum made by the sea with a tasting room and Gin-making school to boot.

Salcombe Gin 'Start Point' is the first product they produced and it still forms the core of their range. The name not only refers to the beginning of their business, but also to the nearby "Start Point Lighthouse" that juts out into the English Channel. The Gin is made with the London Dry Method to infuse thirteen botanicals, including Macedonian juniper; the fresh peels of lemon, lime and red grapefruit; cardamom; licorice; cinnamon; chamomile; English coriander seeds; angelica root; and cubeb berries.

Smartass Corner:
The "London Dry Method" infuses the botanicals into Spirit during the distillation process. No flavor infusions can be added or blended after the fact.
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The fragrance is bright and fresh with zesty citrus and florals over a bit of pine.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The flavor profile builds upon the citrus and florals with earthy notes of coriander and juniper with a nice peppery bite.

Finish
The finish is brisk and clean with a lingering savory note.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Salcombe Gin 'Start Point' taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Salcombe Gin 'Start Point' and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • citrus
  • floral
  • zesty
  • pine
  • savoury
  • fragrant
  • botanicals
  • cardamom
  • chamomile
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Few Gin distillers make their own alcohol. Gin usually starts with neutral Spirit: A commodity that distillers buy in bulk. It’s what the distiller does with this commodity in the flavor-infusing process that makes each Gin different.
Is Gin gluten free? Sort of. While Gin is made from a grain Spirit, which could include wheat, barley or even rye, some experts say that it’s still suitable for those on gluten-free diets due to being distilled. The distillation process removes enough of the gluten protein in the drink to make it gluten-free. But proceed with caution.
Gin was so cheap and popular in London in the first half of the 18th century, an epidemic of drunkenness engulfed the city. There were 7,000 Gin shops by 1730 and wasted Londoners fell victim to acts of violence and widespread addiction. The government had to step in with an emergency legislation to stop the so-called "Gin Craze".
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Few Gin distillers make their own alcohol. Gin usually starts with neutral Spirit: A commodity that distillers buy in bulk. It’s what the distiller does with this commodity in the flavor-infusing process that makes each Gin different.
Is Gin gluten free? Sort of. While Gin is made from a grain Spirit, which could include wheat, barley or even rye, some experts say that it’s still suitable for those on gluten-free diets due to being distilled. The distillation process removes enough of the gluten protein in the drink to make it gluten-free. But proceed with caution.
Gin was so cheap and popular in London in the first half of the 18th century, an epidemic of drunkenness engulfed the city. There were 7,000 Gin shops by 1730 and wasted Londoners fell victim to acts of violence and widespread addiction. The government had to step in with an emergency legislation to stop the so-called "Gin Craze".
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