Ron Centenario 25 Years Gran Reserva
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • fruit
  • spicy
  • woody
  • dry
  • floral
  • pear
  • coconut
  • banana
  • oak

Ron Centenario

25 Years Gran Reserva (0.7l, 40%)
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Character Goatson
Costa Rican Rum lovingly aged using the Solera method for a complex, fruit-forward palate.

Ron Zacapa is named after a town in eastern Guatemala — "Ron" means Rum and Zacapa is the town. Their plantation is located high on the volcanic plains of Retalhuleu. They have been making premium Rum in Central America for more than one hundred years, and their Centenario line is one of the most sought-after by Rum-lovers and collectors alike. All of the Rums they produce across their portfolio are really top notch.

Ron Centenario 25 Years Gran Reserva is a sugarcane-based Costa Rican Rum aged in the Solera method. This Solera cycle creates a smooth, sophisticated sipped with Spirits aged between six and twenty-five years in ex-Bourbon casks. This results in a complex and fruity flavor profile at 40% ABV that deserves to be sipped neat… in a snifter… at sunset….

Smartass Corner:
Fairly common to Sherry, Scotch, Cognac, and Rum, Solera aging is where a portion of the aging Spirit is left in the barrel. Then the barrel is refilled. The number of partial emptying / refills and length of time varies, but the idea is to end with a natural blend across a range of agings.
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Warm Mahogany

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma is fruity and floral with notes of juicy pear, banana, coconut water, and oak.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The flavor profile is full of wood notes — from oak to cedar — with layers of fruits and exotic spices underneath.

Finish
The finish is medium-to-long and lightly dry.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Ron Centenario 25 Years Gran Reserva taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Ron Centenario 25 Years Gran Reserva and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • fruit
  • spicy
  • woody
  • dry
  • floral
  • pear
  • coconut
  • banana
  • oak
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
from From the flaviar times