Rey Campero Espadin
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery Rey Campero
  • Style Mezcal
  • Alcohol 48%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • orange peel
  • fruit
  • tobacco
  • olive
  • brine
  • marshmallow
  • agave
  • apple
  • smoky

Rey Campero

Espadin (0.75l, 48%)
Price $51.99

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Character Goatson
Rey Campero Espadín is made by Rómulo Sánchez Parada in Candeleria Yegloe south of Oaxaca. This tiny village of 150 people boasts two great Mezcal brands, Rey Campero and Vago, many more are made in the region so population definitely does not correlate to the number, variety or quality of Mezcal
 
Rómulo learned to make Mezcal from his father and grandfather but the family history in the business goes back to his great grandmother, Clara Manzano Rios who build the family’s palenque in 1870 and started distilling with her husband Nicolas Sanchez. It was the first palenque built in Candelaria Yegolé. Flash forward more than a century, Rómulo was primed to start distilling but the economy was so bad in Oaxaca that he only got this brand started in 2012. 
 
Now that there is a wider appreciation for Mezcal we can enjoy the fruits of Rómulo’s labor. Rey Campero is imported to the U.S. by Mezcal savant William Scanlan who runs the awesomely named Heavy Metl Imports. He selected this Espadín for the reasons we love it, because it is a full expression of the land where the agave are grown and of Rómulo’s sensibility
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery Rey Campero
  • Style Mezcal
  • Alcohol 48%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Tasting Notes
 
Appearance / Color 
Completely clear. 
 
Nose / Aroma / Smell 
Tepache, straw, olive brine.
 
Flavor / Taste / Palate
Orange peel, marshmallow, hoja santa.
 
Finish
Oregano, tobacco, clay.
 
Flavor Spiral TM
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What does Rey Campero Espadin taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Rey Campero Espadin and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

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  • orange peel
  • fruit
  • tobacco
  • olive
  • brine
  • marshmallow
  • agave
  • apple
  • smoky
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Mezcalero Romulo Sanchez Parada is the first documented mezcalero to tame agave Jabali which is known to foam and even explode during distillation.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Mezcalero Romulo Sanchez Parada is the first documented mezcalero to tame agave Jabali which is known to foam and even explode during distillation.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
from From the flaviar times