Raymond Ragnaud Hors d'Age Grande Champagne Cognac
*please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Raymond Ragnaud

Hors d'Age Grande Champagne Cognac (0.75l, 43%*) *please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary

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Character Goatson

Raymond Ragnaud was officially founded in 1941, but its origins go all the way to the mid-1800s. Back then already, the Ragnaud family owned a small vineyard in the Grande Champagne region. Today, it’s Françoise Ragnaud-Bricq and her daughter Stéphanie who carry on the family’s centuries old tradition, making unique Eaux-de-vie from the estate's crops.

This is a blend from the reserves of the old Cognacs of Maison Raymond Ragnaud. A precious and patient testament of time, it brings sophisticated notes of stewed white fruit, reine-claude, and mirabelle. So chic!

 


*This bottle is a collector’s item; we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders are limited to one item per person, as we wish to give everyone the opportunity to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

*please note that the ABV of this bottle may vary California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
Nine liters of white Wine must be distilled for a single liter of Cognac!
There are three different qualities of Cognac recognized by law: V.S. (very special), V.S.O.P. (Very Superior Old Pale), and X.O. (Extra Old).
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Laws concerning Cognac-making are strict as hell. Only three types of grapes may be used, and they can only be harvested in October; Cognac must be aged for at least two years in barrels made from French oak - and get this, from one of two specific forests! Then, the stills must be of a particular French shape (no, not the baguette shape); and we guess La Marseillaise has to be sung during the entire process.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
Nine liters of white Wine must be distilled for a single liter of Cognac!
There are three different qualities of Cognac recognized by law: V.S. (very special), V.S.O.P. (Very Superior Old Pale), and X.O. (Extra Old).
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Laws concerning Cognac-making are strict as hell. Only three types of grapes may be used, and they can only be harvested in October; Cognac must be aged for at least two years in barrels made from French oak - and get this, from one of two specific forests! Then, the stills must be of a particular French shape (no, not the baguette shape); and we guess La Marseillaise has to be sung during the entire process.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
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