Plantation Barbados 2011 Rum
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • oak spice
  • cinnamon
  • ginger
  • pepper
  • nuts
  • chocolate
  • caramel
  • vanilla
  • lemon

Plantation

Barbados 2011 Rum (0.75l, 51.1%)
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Character Goatson

Only 24 casks of this mysterious Barbadian-French beauty were made.

Barbados really gave us so much. First of all, there's the one and only Rihanna but as if that wasn't enough, it's also the birthplace of Rum. Plantation Rum is owned by the famous French Cognac house Maison Ferrand, led by the masterful Alexandre Gabriel that has decades of experience. He's also a Rum aficionado, so it made perfect sense when he began his love affair with resurrecting ancient Rum-making techniques in Barbados.

Plantation Barbados 2011 Rum is produced at the West Indies Distillery, which was founded in 1893 and it stands right on a gorgeous white beach. This rare beauty leads a lonely existence as it's rested in American Oak ex-Bourbon casks for 4-5 years in a part of the distillery called 'the no man's land' – only the master distiller and the master blender are familiar with its whereabouts. Then, it travels to the Ferrand cellars in the Cognac region where it's finished for another 4-5 years. Only 24 casks were made of this deliciously smooth exotic dram.
 

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Gold

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Oak spice, cinnamon, ginger and pepper, raisins, prunes, orange peel and hazelnuts.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Walnuts, chocolate, caramel, nutmeg, vanilla, citrus zest, and dried fruits

Finish
Long

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Plantation Barbados 2011 Rum taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Plantation Barbados 2011 Rum and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • oak spice
  • cinnamon
  • ginger
  • pepper
  • nuts
  • chocolate
  • caramel
  • vanilla
  • lemon
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Six months out of the year, eucalyptus trees fuel the power generation plant creating jobs and reducing Nicaragua's dependence on foreign oil.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Six months out of the year, eucalyptus trees fuel the power generation plant creating jobs and reducing Nicaragua's dependence on foreign oil.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
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