Penelope Bourbon Barrel Strength Batch 6
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region New Jersey
  • Distillery MGP Indiana
  • Age 3 Year Old
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 57.9%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • fruit
  • syrup
  • citrus
  • orange zest
  • black cherry
  • smoky
  • grain
  • caramel
  • oak

Penelope Bourbon

Barrel Strength Batch 6 (0.7l, 57.9%)
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Character Goatson

Penelope is easy to fall in love with. This Bourbon just keeps getting better!

Mike Paladini and his wife Kerry had long agreed that if they had a daughter she would be named Penelope. In 2018 they had that daughter, named her as intended, and founded Penelope Bourbon at the same time with Mike’s childhood friend Danny Polise. As many start-up Spirits companies do, they have launched with a little outside help. In this case distilling and aging in Indiana at MGP and expert blending and bottling assistance from Castle Rock in Kentucky — whom they proudly call part of their team. And the team is working, with two successful releases under their belt and a fistful of awards already in hand.

The Penelope Bourbon Barrel Strength just seems to get better with each batch. Now we're at Batch 6 and it has us super excited again. It's a blend of 3 MGP Bourbons comprised of 4 grains (corn, wheat, rye, and malt), aged 3.5 to 4.5 years in new American oak with a #4 char on the staves and #2 char on the heads. Naturally, it's uncut and non-chill-filtered. The 115.8-proof Bourbon is a little gem of a Whiskey with plenty of awards to show for it, but most importantly ― it's just a mighty fine sipper.

 

*This bottle is a collector’s item; we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders are limited to one item per person, as we wish to give everyone the opportunity to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region New Jersey
  • Distillery MGP Indiana
  • Age 3 Year Old
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Alcohol 57.9%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Deep Mahogany

Nose / Aroma / Smell
It's one enticing nose with rich fruit and sweet syrup aromas, as well as some grain notes and citrusy orange zest.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Black cherries are on the palate along with a touch of smoke and savory grain notes. There's more orange peel and fruit, some caramel sweetness, and plenty of oak as well.

Finish
It's a pleasantly sweet finish with a wonderful balance and hints of smoke and granola. 

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Penelope Bourbon Barrel Strength Batch 6 taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Penelope Bourbon Barrel Strength Batch 6 and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • fruit
  • syrup
  • citrus
  • orange zest
  • black cherry
  • smoky
  • grain
  • caramel
  • oak
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
In November of 2015, MGP announced its first ever house brand — Metze’s Select Indiana Straight Whiskey. It is a blend of their high-Rye Bourbons, named after the Master Distiller who retired that year. It is not yet available on the market.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
Bourbons are very high in vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
In November of 2015, MGP announced its first ever house brand — Metze’s Select Indiana Straight Whiskey. It is a blend of their high-Rye Bourbons, named after the Master Distiller who retired that year. It is not yet available on the market.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
Bourbons are very high in vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
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