Peloton de la Muerte Criollo Mezcal
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • cherry
  • candied
  • apple
  • juicy
  • pine
  • fresh
  • smoky
  • soft
  • smooth

Pelotón de la Muerte

Peloton de la Muerte Criollo Mezcal (0.75l, 50.2%)
Price $45.99

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Character Goatson

A rare and unique expression of agave Criollo.

Peloton de la Muerte is another Mezcal-icious brainchild of Danny Mena. He started a single boutique bar in 2005 — the only establishment focused exclusively on artisanal Mezcal in Mexico City. In 2007, they opened a similar bar in New York called "Hecho en Dumbo." From there it was a small step to acquiring and independently bottling the Mexican Spirits they love.

Pelotón de la Meurte is a sub-brand of his Mezcals de Leyenda. The collection of artisanal Mezcals from Oaxaca and Guerrero comes from the first Mezcaleria in the world: La botica in Mexico City. The flag that you see on the label holds a very special meaning: it’s the banner that represented the army called The Squadron of Death (or, Peloton de la Muerte) that seeked vengeance for Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the leader of the Mexican War of Independence.

Pelotón de la Muerte Criollo Mezcal is a rare expression that managed to capture the beauty of agave Criollo that’s not usually used in Mezcals. Coming from Guerrero, this sipper releases intense aromas of ripe cherries and candied apples that lead to the juicy and unique palate with fresh pine and medium smoke, rounded by a long delicate finish.

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Intense with ripe cherries and candied apples.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Juicy and unique with fresh pine and medium smoke.

Finish
Long and delicate.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Peloton de la Muerte Criollo Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Peloton de la Muerte Criollo Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • cherry
  • candied
  • apple
  • juicy
  • pine
  • fresh
  • smoky
  • soft
  • smooth
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
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