Old Rip Van Winkle 10 Year Old 107 Proof
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Buffalo Trace
  • Age 10 Year Old
  • Style Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Maturation Virgin American oak
  • Alcohol 53.5%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Old Rip Van Winkle

10 Year Old 107 Proof (0.75l, 53.5%)
Price $2,000.00

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Character Goatson

One of the youngest members of the Van Winkle family, this Bourbon is just a splash of water away from being barrel proof at 53.5% ABV. Aged for ten years, it delivers all the characteristics of Van Winkle lineage, bringing you that raw essence of a pure Kentucky Bourbon. An edgy mouthful that delivers all that well-known Pappy jazz.

 

*This bottle is a collector's item, we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders limited to one item per person, as we wish to give everyone the opportunity to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Buffalo Trace
  • Age 10 Year Old
  • Style Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Maturation Virgin American oak
  • Alcohol 53.5%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Old Rip Van Winkle 10 Year Old 107 Proof taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Old Rip Van Winkle 10 Year Old 107 Proof and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
The Buffalo Trace Distillery was one of the few production facilities that was allowed to remain in operation during Prohibition for "medicinal purposes."
Bourbons have very prominent notes of vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Bourbons are very high in vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
The Buffalo Trace Distillery was one of the few production facilities that was allowed to remain in operation during Prohibition for "medicinal purposes."
Bourbons have very prominent notes of vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Bourbons are very high in vanilla, as American White Oak is naturally high in vanillins.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
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