Normindia Gin
  • Category Gin
  • Country France
  • Distillery Normindia
  • Style Gin
  • Alcohol 41.4%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Normindia

Gin (0.7l, 41.4%)

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Character Goatson

A unique French Gin from a Calvados-making family.

Pierre is the third-generation of the Domaine du Coquerel family that has been producing Calvados in their distillery since 1937. After traveling in India, he was inspired by the abundance of exotic spices they have over there and so the idea for Gin Normindia was born.

Pierre then found an old recipe in an old family book that dated back to 1765 that was approved by the then King of France, Louis XV. The Spirit was called 'La Chymie du Goût et de l’Odorat', which basically means the chemistry of flavors and aromas. He went to work and began experimentation: 42 macerations and 33 micro-distillations later, the final recipe was reated.

Gin Normindia is 100% produced at the family estate. The maceration lasts for 4 to 12 days in a stainless steel vat before the Gin is distilled in the smallest Calvados copper still, yielding 10,000 bottles per batch. The recipe is comprised of 15 botanicals, including apple, orange, cinnamon, juniper, lily, clove, ginger, and coriander. This is a fresh, fruity, and light Gin that’s reminiscent of Clavados flavors with its light spices and floral notes.
 

  • Category Gin
  • Country France
  • Distillery Normindia
  • Style Gin
  • Alcohol 41.4%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Crystal clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Very aromatic

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Orchard fruits, sweet spice, and fresh floral notes.

Finish
Distinct and slightly floral and spicy.

Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Few Gin distillers make their own alcohol. Gin usually starts with neutral Spirit: A commodity that distillers buy in bulk. It’s what the distiller does with this commodity in the flavor-infusing process that makes each Gin different.
As with many other Spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as a medicine—to battle malaria.
Juniper berry is the main ingredient of Gin. They are usually picked wild by independent workers throughout Europe and sold via distributors to Gin makers worldwide.
It’s a common myth that Gin is a tear-jerker. Of course, drinking too much of it will make you feel awful the next day, but that’s the same with any alcohol.
As producers try to develop new styles and flavors of Gin, to push the category and find a niche, the need for trying new methods of extracting flavors, as well as using more unusual botanicals, has grown.

One such way is the vacuum distillation method, when the redistillation of botanicals takes place in a vacuum.
While juniper-heavy Gin is perfect for your daily G&T, it is also complemented extremely well by tea flavours such as Earl Grey. Try steeping Earl Grey tea bags in Gin for an hour before mixing it with lemon juice and soda for a refreshing tipple. This one gets you additional kudos, so let’s keep it between us.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Few Gin distillers make their own alcohol. Gin usually starts with neutral Spirit: A commodity that distillers buy in bulk. It’s what the distiller does with this commodity in the flavor-infusing process that makes each Gin different.
As with many other Spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as a medicine—to battle malaria.
Juniper berry is the main ingredient of Gin. They are usually picked wild by independent workers throughout Europe and sold via distributors to Gin makers worldwide.
It’s a common myth that Gin is a tear-jerker. Of course, drinking too much of it will make you feel awful the next day, but that’s the same with any alcohol.
As producers try to develop new styles and flavors of Gin, to push the category and find a niche, the need for trying new methods of extracting flavors, as well as using more unusual botanicals, has grown.

One such way is the vacuum distillation method, when the redistillation of botanicals takes place in a vacuum.
While juniper-heavy Gin is perfect for your daily G&T, it is also complemented extremely well by tea flavours such as Earl Grey. Try steeping Earl Grey tea bags in Gin for an hour before mixing it with lemon juice and soda for a refreshing tipple. This one gets you additional kudos, so let’s keep it between us.
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