Nankai Gold Shochu
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • warm
  • oak
  • apple
  • floral
  • honey
  • ginger
  • milk chocolate
  • fruit
  • silky

Nanakai

Nankai Gold Shochu (0.75l, 43%)
Price $79.99

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Character Goatson

Nankai Gold is one of the finest aged Shochus we’ve had in years with a nuanced, sophisticated flavor profile.

We love this story. Paul and Mai Makayama took their honeymoon to visit their parent home town in Japan in 2015. They tasted a local “black sugar” Shochu there for the first time and fell in love with the Spirit. When they returned home they created a company to import authentic, sugar-based Shochu — Shochu Honkaku Kokuto — back to the states. Since then, Nankai Shochu has become the leading importer of this traditional Japanese Spirit.

Nankai Gold Shochu is a blend of cask-aged Shochu produced, koji fermented, and aged up to five years in a combination of American and Limousin oak casks. The mash bill is 80% “black sugar” and 20% rice, delivering a lovely floral quality. Further, they use vacuum distillation which allows for less heating — preserving more of the natural aromatic and flavorful esters. And while the vast majority of the time Shochu is delivered at about 20% ABV, Nankai Gold is bottled at 43% ABV. It is a truly exception example of fine Shochu and winner of multiple Gold Medals at international competitions.

Smartass Corner:
Japanese is a truly wonderful language. The word “honkaku” by itself can mean “authentic” or refer to Japanese mystery literature. The word “kokuto” can mean “rich,” “richness,” or “brown sugar.” Together they can mean “authentic richness” or, in context, “really/reality.”

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Pale Gold

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma is elegant and sophisticated with notes of warm oak, apples, and florals.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The palate is silky with a nuanced profile of fruits, ginger cookies, light honey, sultanas, and even a bit of milk chocolate.

Finish
The finish is delicate and warm.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Nankai Gold Shochu taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Nankai Gold Shochu and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • warm
  • oak
  • apple
  • floral
  • honey
  • ginger
  • milk chocolate
  • fruit
  • silky
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Japanese Whisky is connected both to Scotch and Bourbon. It’s a Scotch-style Spirit that’s matured in climates similar to Kentucky’s.
The two biggest Whisky producers in Japan are Nikka and Suntory, major rivals.
It's not uncommon for Japanese Whisky to be aged in mizunara (Japanese oak) casks. Suntory conducted a research on how mizunara oak influences Whisky flavor and found out it adds coconut notes to it.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
The two biggest Whisky producers in Japan and major rivals are Nikka and Suntory.
Japanese Single Malts, like Scotch, are double-distilled in pot stills. Grain Whiskies, on the other hand, are distilled in column stills.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Japanese Whisky is connected both to Scotch and Bourbon. It’s a Scotch-style Spirit that’s matured in climates similar to Kentucky’s.
The two biggest Whisky producers in Japan are Nikka and Suntory, major rivals.
It's not uncommon for Japanese Whisky to be aged in mizunara (Japanese oak) casks. Suntory conducted a research on how mizunara oak influences Whisky flavor and found out it adds coconut notes to it.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
The two biggest Whisky producers in Japan and major rivals are Nikka and Suntory.
Japanese Single Malts, like Scotch, are double-distilled in pot stills. Grain Whiskies, on the other hand, are distilled in column stills.
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