Martin Miller's Westbourne Strength Gin
  • Category Gin
  • Country United Kingdom
  • Distillery Millers
  • Style Gin
  • Alcohol 45.2%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • spicy
  • citrus peel
  • cucumber
  • nutmeg
  • cinnamon
  • juniper
  • oily
  • rye
  • dry

Martin's

Martin Miller's Westbourne Strength Gin (0.75l, 45.2%)
Price $39.99

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Character Goatson
An exciting adventure in Gin!


Martin Miller’s Gin
 pride themselves on their unique distilling methods. Usually Gin is distilled through three pot stills, with one for high feints an one for low feints, or heads and tails. Martin Miller’s do away with these and focus solely of the heart. Using only one pot still, made in 1898 and affectionately named Angela, to create some of the finest Gin around. They also blend their product with the clearest Icelandic water, drawing it up from deep wells and using it add an exquisite purity to their drinks.
 
Having won countless Golds at drinks awards all over the globe, Martin Miller’s Westbourne Strength Gin is some of the best spirit out there. This juniper based spirits brings together citrus and spice, making for an exciting adventure in Gin. The mouth feel is luxurious in itself, and combined with elegant flavours, makes for a truly inspiring spirit. This is a light expression that focuses on its freshness and uses this to highlight the wonderful juniper flavours.

  • Category Gin
  • Country United Kingdom
  • Distillery Millers
  • Style Gin
  • Alcohol 45.2%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Martin Miller's Westbourne Strength Gin taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Martin Miller's Westbourne Strength Gin and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • spicy
  • citrus peel
  • cucumber
  • nutmeg
  • cinnamon
  • juniper
  • oily
  • rye
  • dry
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Gin gets its dominant flavour from juniper berries. As with many other spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as medicine. Yeah right!
While juniper-heavy Gin is perfect for your daily G&T, it is also complemented extremely well by tea flavours such as Earl Grey. Try steeping Earl Grey tea bags in Gin for an hour before mixing it with lemon juice and soda for a refreshing tipple. This one gets you additional kudos, so let’s keep it between us.
How much Tonic is in a Gin & Tonic? The ideal proportions for a perfect Gin & Tonic is one part Gin and two parts Tonic.
As with many other Spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as a medicine—to battle malaria.
It’s a common myth that Gin is a tear-jerker. Of course, drinking too much of it will make you feel awful the next day, but that’s the same with any alcohol.
As producers try to develop new styles and flavors of Gin, to push the category and find a niche, the need for trying new methods of extracting flavors, as well as using more unusual botanicals, has grown.

One such way is the vacuum distillation method, when the redistillation of botanicals takes place in a vacuum.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Gin gets its dominant flavour from juniper berries. As with many other spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as medicine. Yeah right!
While juniper-heavy Gin is perfect for your daily G&T, it is also complemented extremely well by tea flavours such as Earl Grey. Try steeping Earl Grey tea bags in Gin for an hour before mixing it with lemon juice and soda for a refreshing tipple. This one gets you additional kudos, so let’s keep it between us.
How much Tonic is in a Gin & Tonic? The ideal proportions for a perfect Gin & Tonic is one part Gin and two parts Tonic.
As with many other Spirits, Gin was originally intended to be used as a medicine—to battle malaria.
It’s a common myth that Gin is a tear-jerker. Of course, drinking too much of it will make you feel awful the next day, but that’s the same with any alcohol.
As producers try to develop new styles and flavors of Gin, to push the category and find a niche, the need for trying new methods of extracting flavors, as well as using more unusual botanicals, has grown.

One such way is the vacuum distillation method, when the redistillation of botanicals takes place in a vacuum.
Ratings & Reviews
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