Martell Caractere Cognac
  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Martell
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • citrus
  • grape
  • tangerine
  • cinnamon
  • raisin
  • lemon
  • grain
  • pear
  • prunes

Martell

Caractere Cognac (0.7l, 40%)
Oooops. This bottle is not available yet.
Add it to your wishlist and we will let you know once we get it.

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson
Martell Caractère is Straight up Homegrown.

If you make anything for over three centuries, chances are you are pretty damn good at it. House Martell is the eldest of the major Cognac houses. Founded in 1715 by Jean Martell along the banks of the Chantere, at the pinnacle of the French “L’Art de Vivre.” The French basically have this way of living, where they believe in embracing all of the good stuff life has to offer. Martell Cognac is definitely the good stuff, with a full range of expressions for us to indulge in. La vie est belle, d’accord? Cheers to House Martell.

The young Briton put himself on the map by marrying into "Cognac royalty" not once, but twice! His second marriage was to Jeanne-Rachel Lallemand, “a direct descendant of Jacques Roux, a pioneering 17th century cognac merchant,” by the 19th century, Martell had become the biggest international exporter of Cognac in the world, reaching as far as China and Japan.

Now under Pernod Ricard, House Martell has robust range of Cognacs; a collection of 10 expressions. They predominantly use Ugni Blanc (Trebbiano) grapes from the Borderies vineyards, aging its Cognac in Tronçais oak casks. They double distill their blends, with traditional “Charentais alembics” (pot stills).

Martell's diverse range of expressions includes their unique Martell Caractère, which definitely distinguishes itself among the others in the Martell core lineup. Caractère uses grapes straight from the vines of the Domaine de Jean Martell vineyards. This Martell, it is rich, bold, and original, with fresh notes of citrus. Martell’s Cellar Master, Benoit Fil, blends two types of eaux-de-vie to create the Cognac. “The eaux-de-vie are distilled twice without leas and aged in fine grain French barrels.”
  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Martell
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance/Color
Golden amber

Nose/ Aroma/ Smell
Pear, citrus, cinnamon, vanilla, prunes, raisins

Flavor/ Taste/ Palate
Lemon, tangerine peel

Finish
Long with notes of pastry and plum jam
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Martell Caractere Cognac taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Martell Caractere Cognac and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • citrus
  • grape
  • tangerine
  • cinnamon
  • raisin
  • lemon
  • grain
  • pear
  • prunes
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Nine liters of white Wine must be distilled for a single liter of Cognac!
Cognac, named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy (distilled wine). It is only produced in the wine-growing region surrounding this town. Cognac must be made from specified grapes, be twice distilled in copper pot stills, and be aged at least two years in French oak barrels. Most Cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement.
Laws concerning Cognac-making are strict as hell. Only three types of grapes may be used, and they can only be harvested in October; Cognac must be aged for at least two years in barrels made from French oak - and get this, from one of two specific forests! Then, the stills must be of a particular French shape (no, not the baguette shape); and we guess La Marseillaise has to be sung during the entire process.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Nine liters of white Wine must be distilled for a single liter of Cognac!
Cognac, named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy (distilled wine). It is only produced in the wine-growing region surrounding this town. Cognac must be made from specified grapes, be twice distilled in copper pot stills, and be aged at least two years in French oak barrels. Most Cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement.
Laws concerning Cognac-making are strict as hell. Only three types of grapes may be used, and they can only be harvested in October; Cognac must be aged for at least two years in barrels made from French oak - and get this, from one of two specific forests! Then, the stills must be of a particular French shape (no, not the baguette shape); and we guess La Marseillaise has to be sung during the entire process.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
from From the flaviar times