Los Azulejos Día de Muertos Añejo
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • sweet
  • agave
  • oak
  • vanilla
  • caramel
  • orange
  • chocolate
  • soft
  • smooth

Los Azulejos

Día de Muertos Añejo (0.75l, 40%)
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Character Goatson

The cool, hand-made bottle is just the beginning of the experience.

Los Azulejos Tequila is produced in the heart of the motherland of the agave-forward Spirit: Jalisco, Mexico. It was founded by Don Pedro Quantinilla, a Mexico City native who wanted to share his passion for Mexican art and craft with the rest of the world. Quantinilla named his traditionally-made authentic Tequila after the famous painted Talavera tiles, called ‘azulejos’, that you can see on the fancier houses in Mexico and some other countries.

But art is not the only thing that Mexicans do differently. They do holidays in their own joyful way, too. Take The Day of the Dead or ‘Dia de Muertos’, which is a colorful celebration of the lives of the dead. I guess you could say that instead of “crying because it’s over, they smile because it happened”? In any case, it’s quite different from how most of the world views death.

Azulejos Día de Muertos Añejo comes in an artfully hand-crafted clay Talavera bottle that was hand-painted and embodies the spirit of Mexican art and culture. But this is not just one of those gimmicks where the bottle is the main act. The Tequila is distilled in stainless steel stills and then again slowly in copper stills. It rests for 30 months in French oak and comes out with a lovely rich body that’s way more complex than your ordinary Añejo.
 

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Light gold

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Sweet agave flavors with Cognac and oak.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Soft with warm notes of vanilla, caramel, orange and chocolate.

Finish
Very smooth

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Los Azulejos Día de Muertos Añejo taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Los Azulejos Día de Muertos Añejo and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • sweet
  • agave
  • oak
  • vanilla
  • caramel
  • orange
  • chocolate
  • soft
  • smooth
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
The strongest Tequila available for sale clocks in at 75% ABV (150 proof). This shouldn’t come as a surprise, but drinking huge amounts of this spirit is likely te-quil-a.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
The strongest Tequila available for sale clocks in at 75% ABV (150 proof). This shouldn’t come as a surprise, but drinking huge amounts of this spirit is likely te-quil-a.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
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