The Kraken Black Spiced Rum (1L)
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

The Kraken

Black Spiced Rum (1L) (1l, 40%)
Oooops. This bottle is not available yet.
Add it to your wishlist and we will let you know once we get it.

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson

Release the Kraken!

Many years ago in the Caribbean Islands a ship carrying a large quantity of black spiced Rum mysteriously disappeared. It is rumored that the ship was attacked by the Kraken, a legendary sea monster known for its deadly tentacles, razor sharp teeth, and insatiable appetite. Probably no legendary creature was as horrifying as the Kraken. According to the stories this huge, many armed creature looked like an island when motionless and could reach as high as the top of a sailing ship's main mast with its arms deployed.
 
Kraken Black Spiced Rum is distilled in pot stills on the Virgin Islands and fermented from molasses made from sugar cane grown on nearby riverbanks. Natural yeasts are used to ferment the water thinned molasses, which is converted directly into alcohol. Kraken Rum is then aged in oak barrels for 12 to 24 months before being blended with a range of spices, including cinnamon, ginger and clove.

Smartass Corner:
When faced with a bottle of spiced Rum, the most obvious thing to do is mix it with Coke. If you’re feeling more adventurous, go for spiced Rum with Ginger Beer or Root Beer.

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Black like molasses, or squid ink, if you must.
 
Nose / Aroma / Smell
Heavy chocolate up front with coffee and cinnamon.
 
Flavor / Taste / Palate
Chocolate sweetness, molasses and vanilla mingle with spices commonly associated with Rum; clove, cinnamon, ginger and galangal.
 
Finish
Slightly warming with a big punch of vanilla, a touch of coffee and a hint of pepper.

Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
from