The Kraken Attacks Illinois
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • caramel
  • toffee
  • spicy
  • sweet
  • vanilla
  • cinnamon
  • nutmeg
  • rich
  • smooth

The Kraken

Attacks Illinois (0.75l, 47%)

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Character Goatson

Apparently, The Kraken has got a taste for deep dish pizza.

Many years ago in the Caribbean Islands a ship carrying a large quantity of black spiced Rum mysteriously disappeared. It is rumored that the ship was attacked by the Kraken, a legendary sea monster known for its deadly tentacles, razor sharp teeth, and insatiable appetite. Probably no legendary creature was as horrifying as the Kraken. According to the stories this huge, many armed creature looked like an island when motionless and could reach as high as the top of a sailing ship's main mast with its arms deployed.

No wonder then The Kraken Attacks limited collection of spiced Rums has got everybody in the Rum world shaking. Each special edition goes after a different American city. The word on the street has it that The Kraken Attacks Illinois, for example, is “as dark as Lake Michigan on a moonless night”. That’s pretty dark. Apparently, it’s been spotted everywhere from the Mississippi to Wabash and it’s got a taste for deep dish pizza? Anyway, this flavorful monster is made with natural flavors and caramel color. An exceptionally smooth Rum that’s best enjoyed in classic Rum cocktails.

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Black

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Caramel, toffee, and spice.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Smooth with cinnamon, vanilla, and nutmeg.

Finish
Lingering and spicy.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does The Kraken Attacks Illinois taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in The Kraken Attacks Illinois and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • caramel
  • toffee
  • spicy
  • sweet
  • vanilla
  • cinnamon
  • nutmeg
  • rich
  • smooth
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum (usually) comes from molasses, the sweet and syrupy residue of refining sugarcane into sugar. Molasses is over 50% sugar, but it also contains significant amounts of minerals and other trace elements, contributing to the final flavor.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Next time you have a tipple of Rum you can say that you're tapping the Admiral. This intriguing phrase comes from the great Admiral Nelson who was killed in the battle of Trafalgar off of Spain. The story is that his body was preserved in Rum to be shipped back to England but, when the barrel arrived, some of the Rum was missing and said to have been siphoned off by some desperate or unknowing sailors. It's a great story but most likely false.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum (usually) comes from molasses, the sweet and syrupy residue of refining sugarcane into sugar. Molasses is over 50% sugar, but it also contains significant amounts of minerals and other trace elements, contributing to the final flavor.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Next time you have a tipple of Rum you can say that you're tapping the Admiral. This intriguing phrase comes from the great Admiral Nelson who was killed in the battle of Trafalgar off of Spain. The story is that his body was preserved in Rum to be shipped back to England but, when the barrel arrived, some of the Rum was missing and said to have been siphoned off by some desperate or unknowing sailors. It's a great story but most likely false.
Rum is why we measure alcohol proof. To make sure Rum wasn’t watered down, it had to be ‘proven’ by soaking gunpowder with it. If it was ‘overproof’ (higher than 57.15 % vol.), then the gunpowder would ignite, but if it wouldn’t, it was ‘underproof.’
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
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