Johnnie Walker A Song of Fire
  • Category Scotch
  • Country Scotland
  • Region Speyside
  • Distillery Cardhu
  • Style Blended Scotch Whisky
  • Alcohol 40.8%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • smoky
  • honey
  • peaty
  • sweet
  • caramel
  • toffee
  • bitter
  • vanilla
  • spicy notes

Johnnie Walker

A Song of Fire (0.7l, 40.8%)
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Character Goatson

A smokier Johnnie Walker with a Dragon Spirit.

Johnnie Walker is one of the most recognized Whisky names in the World. The brand was established in 1860 by John “Johnnie” Walker, when he started blending Whiskies from his grocery shop in Ayrshire, Scotland. During the Victorian Era, success came when his son Alexander exported around the British Empire, establishing the Whisky early as one of the first truly global brands.

Today, Johnnie Walker’s famous square-shaped bottle—with the label set at a jaunty 24 degrees—is THE most popular blended Whisky in the world, selling more than 130 million bottles per year in nearly every country on the planet across their wide range of ages, special editions, and finishes.

Johnnie Walker has had a successful partnership with Game of Thrones for a few years now. It all started with a special edition White Walker release in 2018. Parent company Diageo followed that with eight limited edition Single Malts representing the eight of the Great Houses mentioned in the books and TV series. Now — with the finale of the series, Johnnie Walker is releasing two more special editions that are sure to satisfy fans of Whiskey as much as fans of Game of Thrones.

Johnnie Walker A Song of Fire marries the classic Johnnie Walker Scotch blend with the addition of a peated Single Malt from Caol Isla Distillery to reflect Daenerys Targaryen — The Mother of Dragons.

Smartass corner:
The name of the book series that inspired the HBO videos Called “The Song of Fire and Ice” by George R. R. Martin.

  • Category Scotch
  • Country Scotland
  • Region Speyside
  • Distillery Cardhu
  • Style Blended Scotch Whisky
  • Alcohol 40.8%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Medium Amber

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The nose is a bit smoky — as it should be in this case — with hints of warm toffee.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The flavor profile is a classic Jonnie Walker blend with vanilla and honey notes and a warm peated boost.

Finish
The finish in medium to long with a lingering whiff of smoke.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Johnnie Walker A Song of Fire taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Johnnie Walker A Song of Fire and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • smoky
  • honey
  • peaty
  • sweet
  • caramel
  • toffee
  • bitter
  • vanilla
  • spicy notes
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
When Elizabeth Cumming sold the distillery to Johnnie Walker in 1893, it was under the condition that the Cumming Family -- who made up a large part of the current staff -- continue on running the day-to-day operations.
Beer and malt Whisky seem to have quite a bit in common. Both drinks begin with malted barley, which deliver the enzymes and sugars needed for fermentation when steeped in hot water. The two go their separate ways at the wash stage, where they're fermented or aged to become the adult beverages you know and love.
Single Malt Scotch Whisky is made in Scotland using a pot still distillation process at a single distillery, with malted barley as the only grain ingredient. It must be matured in oak casks in Scotland for at least three years (most Single Malts are matured longer, though).
Is Scotch always Scottish? What do you think? Yes. The answer is yes.
Blended Whiskies are the result of years of craftsmanship and dedication. A master blender does not simply wake up one day with a profound ability to create a cohesive and enjoyable liquid. From nosing the liquid to working out quantities of each different grain and malt to go into the blend, a master blender can take years, if not decades, to train.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
When Elizabeth Cumming sold the distillery to Johnnie Walker in 1893, it was under the condition that the Cumming Family -- who made up a large part of the current staff -- continue on running the day-to-day operations.
Beer and malt Whisky seem to have quite a bit in common. Both drinks begin with malted barley, which deliver the enzymes and sugars needed for fermentation when steeped in hot water. The two go their separate ways at the wash stage, where they're fermented or aged to become the adult beverages you know and love.
Single Malt Scotch Whisky is made in Scotland using a pot still distillation process at a single distillery, with malted barley as the only grain ingredient. It must be matured in oak casks in Scotland for at least three years (most Single Malts are matured longer, though).
Is Scotch always Scottish? What do you think? Yes. The answer is yes.
Blended Whiskies are the result of years of craftsmanship and dedication. A master blender does not simply wake up one day with a profound ability to create a cohesive and enjoyable liquid. From nosing the liquid to working out quantities of each different grain and malt to go into the blend, a master blender can take years, if not decades, to train.
Ratings & Reviews
from From the flaviar times