Ilegal Mezcal Añejo
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • maple
  • clove
  • orange
  • bitter
  • dark chocolate
  • agave
  • sweet
  • smoky

Ilegal Mezcal

Añejo (0.5l, 40%)

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Character Goatson

Great Mezcal isn’t illegal anymore… it’s Ilegal.

One of the leading artisanal mezcals in the world, Ilegal Mezcal is crafted in Oaxaca, Mexico from sustainably sourced espadín agave with artisanal methods and ‘sin prisa’, which means without rush or hurry. A small batch Spirit, each bottle of Ilegal is hand corked, labeled, and numbered. it is smooth, approachable and ultra premium. The brand's name refers to the trips the owner John Rexer used to make when he was smuggling mezcal from Mexico to Guatemala for his bar, Café No Sé. Today, Ilegal is very much legal and focuses on providing a smooth, approachable, and ultra-premium Mezcal to share on adventures and create great stories and truth wilder than fiction.

Ilegal Mezcal Añejo is made from espadín agave that has been roasted in underground ovens in small batches and lightly smoked. The smoke is just enough to bring a complexity and richer aroma to the Spirit. It is aged for thirteen months in a combination of medium-charred American oak, medium-charred French oak and ex-Bourbon casks. The combination works really well together, bringing a deeper flavor profile than you get in some lesser Mezcals with flavors of dark chocolate, sweet agave, and a long-like-a-Monday finish.

California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Maple, clove, bitter orange

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Dark chocolate and sweet agave

Finish
Long and slightly smoky

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Ilegal Mezcal Añejo taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Ilegal Mezcal Añejo and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • maple
  • clove
  • orange
  • bitter
  • dark chocolate
  • agave
  • sweet
  • smoky
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Distileria Tlacolula was the very first distillery registered under the Mezcal Regulatory Council and Mezcal bottled there will have the government registration number of NOM-O01X.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Distileria Tlacolula was the very first distillery registered under the Mezcal Regulatory Council and Mezcal bottled there will have the government registration number of NOM-O01X.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
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