Holmes Cay Barbados 2005 Single Cask Rum
  • Category Rum
  • Country United States
  • Region New York
  • Distillery Foursquare
  • Age 14 Year Old
  • Distillation date 2005
  • Style Rum
  • Bottling date 2019
  • Maturation ex-Bourbon casks
  • Alcohol 64.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • toffee
  • orange zest
  • raisin
  • clove
  • coffee
  • toasted oak
  • milk chocolate
  • ginger
  • cardamom

Holmes Cay

Barbados 2005 Single Cask Rum (0.7l, 64.3%)
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Character Goatson
An exception, beautifully-aged Barbados single-cask Rum with a dense, complex palate.

Windyside Spirits was founded by husband & wife combo Eric Kaye and Maura Gedid. Eric introduced Maura to fine aged Rums while they were dating and it became a shared passion. They formed Windyside Spirits in 2019 and set to importing premium single-cask Rums to support their new Holmes Cay brand. Their first stop, the famous Foursquare Distillery in Barbados where Eric and Maura struck a deal for their inaugural release.

Turns out that there were a bunch of exceptionally-aged casks of Rum sitting in the coastal warehouses of Barbados. Holmes Cay Single Cask Rum Barbados 2005 has been sitting in first-fill ex-Bourbon casks under the Caribbean sun for eleven years plus three more years in the UK. But it’s even better than that. This Rum is a combination of pot and column distilled Spirit bottled at a full cask strength of 64.3% ABV with NOTHING added — no artificial colors or flavors and not even a drop of extra water to cut the proof. A more pure express is hard to imagine. And as a single-cask release, there are only 504 bottles for all of us to share.

Just thinking about that makes the mouth water.
  • Category Rum
  • Country United States
  • Region New York
  • Distillery Foursquare
  • Age 14 Year Old
  • Distillation date 2005
  • Style Rum
  • Bottling date 2019
  • Maturation ex-Bourbon casks
  • Alcohol 64.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Deep Mahogany

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma is powerful and fiery and thick with spices running the gamut from ginger to cardamom and anise followed by richer notes of coffee beans, brown sugar, oranges, and chocolate.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
With just a splash of water the palate opens up beautifully with a rich complexity of crispy toffee, orange zest, raisins, clove, and mocha latte.

Finish
The finish is crisp with a lingering note of toasted oak.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Holmes Cay Barbados 2005 Single Cask Rum taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Holmes Cay Barbados 2005 Single Cask Rum and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • toffee
  • orange zest
  • raisin
  • clove
  • coffee
  • toasted oak
  • milk chocolate
  • ginger
  • cardamom
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Common Rum classifications: White, Golden or Amber, Dark, Spiced, Añejo and Age-Dated Rums.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Common Rum classifications: White, Golden or Amber, Dark, Spiced, Añejo and Age-Dated Rums.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
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