Herradura Tequila Añejo
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Lowland
  • Distillery Herradura
  • Style Tequila Añejo
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • herbal
  • citrus
  • vanilla
  • custard
  • oak
  • toasted
  • warm
  • zesty

Herradura

Tequila Añejo (0.7l, 40%)
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Character Goatson

A brilliantly-aged Añejo Tequila from the masters as Herradura.

Tequila Herradura is a legendary Tequila producer celebrating one hundred and fifty years. Félix López acquired the distillery from Feliciano Romo in 1870. It remained a family-owned and operated business for more than one hundred and twenty-five years and was seminal in the creation of the reposado and Añejo styles. It has since become a part of Brown-Forman where it is the foundation of their Tequila production. In addition to their own super-premium brand, Located in Amatitán, Jalisco, Mexico, they produce several other brands, including El Jimador — the biggest-selling Tequila in Mexico — among others.

We all already now that Herradura produces high-quality Tequila, right? Well, Herradura Tequila Añejo is ample evidence of that. Let’s make that case starting with a single statistic.

To legally qualify as an Añejo, a Tequila must be aged a minimum of twelve months. That’s why you see a lot of really good Tequilas aged in the twelve to fourteen month range. But Herradura Tequila Añejo is aged more than twice as long as it needs to be — a full twenty-five months in American white oak. Want more proof? Over the last fifteen years it has won fifty-three major industry awards, with eighteen of them Gold Medals. That, my friends, is quality and consistency.

  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Lowland
  • Distillery Herradura
  • Style Tequila Añejo
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Medium Amber

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma balances between earthy herbal notes, citrus, and sweet vanilla custard.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Taken neat, the flavor profile is complex with plenty of warm toasted oak providing the base notes for succulents, cilantro, tangerine zest, anchos, and flan.

Finish
The finish is medium length, herbal, and warm.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Herradura Tequila Añejo taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Herradura Tequila Añejo and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • herbal
  • citrus
  • vanilla
  • custard
  • oak
  • toasted
  • warm
  • zesty
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
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