Grand Traverse Bourbon
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Michigan
  • Distillery Grand Traverse Distillery
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Maturation New oak barrels
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • caramel
  • rye
  • spicy
  • leather
  • tobacco
  • vanilla
  • honey
  • charred
  • malty

Grand Traverse Distillery

Grand Traverse Bourbon (0.7l, 46%)

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Character Goatson
Take a Michi-gander at this here Bourbon, fellas.

This is how it's done in Traverse City: First, you get yourself a German custom-made Arnold Holstein still. Then you go all local. Everything is grown on the nearby Send Brothers Farm, sent down into the distillery once a week, then milled on site. That's how Kent and Landis Rabish, father & son, have done it since opening the Grand Traverse Distillery in the early 2000s. These dudes don't cut corners or take prisoners. It's focus and dedication that brought in all the laurels, crowning their range of Vodkas, Gins, and Whiskeys.

The Grand Traverse Bourbon that's at the core of their lineup is no exception in that regard. The award-winning spirit is all local, from the mash bill of 70% corn, 20% rye, and 10% malted barley, down to the Michigan Great Lakes water that's used to bring it down to 92 proof. There's no chill filtering involved and the juice stays in new oak barrels for 3 years and 3 months. If that's what Michigan style stands for, then sign us up! 
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region Michigan
  • Distillery Grand Traverse Distillery
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whiskey
  • Maturation New oak barrels
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Deep copper

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The corn can be felt on the nose along with some spice from the rye, the peppery kind. There's notes of vanilla, honey, and malt, as well as a hint of char.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
More rye spice reveals itself on the palate and is balanced by caramel sweetness and a hint of leather and tobacco.

Finish
The finish is smooth and ever so slightly warming. 
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Grand Traverse Bourbon taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Grand Traverse Bourbon and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • caramel
  • rye
  • spicy
  • leather
  • tobacco
  • vanilla
  • honey
  • charred
  • malty
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
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