Fortaleza Still Strength Blanco Tequila
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery Los Abuelos
  • Style Blanco Tequila
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Fortaleza

Still Strength Blanco Tequila (0.75l, 46%)

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Character Goatson

A rare and pure Blanco almost straight from the still.

“Technically,”  Fortaleza Tequila launched in 2005. Really, they have been making tequila for five generations and the story of that “technically” comment could fill an entire website. Suffice it to say that Don Cenobio founded his first distillery in 1873, passing it on to generation after generation, then some of the land was sold, then bought back, and renamed Tequila Los Abuelos. But a Rum had that name, so they had to get the trademark thing worked out… yadda, yadda, yadda… now they have been making Tequila under the Fortaleza name for the last decade.

Fortaleza Tequila is based in Jalisco—the Mecca of Tequila—using brick ovens, Tahano stone mills, and a pair of copper pot stills in the escuala-vieja way (old school). They produce a traditional line of three core Tequilas: a Blanco, a Reposado and an Anejo, along with the occasional special edition.

For years, you could only get Fortaleza Still Strength Blanco Tequila at their distillery. Until now. Now, you can basically taste their premium Blanco straight from the still. All the aromas of fruit, baked fully-ripened agave, green olive, and earth are very much there. The palate is a tad brighter and more rustic than the regular Blanco with hints of butter, olive, earth, black pepper, and vegetal notes. The flavors are stronger because they come straight from their small copper pot still without added water before bottling. Just pure premium Blanco flavors.
 

  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery Los Abuelos
  • Style Blanco Tequila
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Crystal clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Aromas of fruit, baked fully-ripened agave, green olive, and earth.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
A tad brighter and more rustic than the regular Blanco with hints of butter, olive, earth, black pepper, and vegetal notes.

Finish
Smooth and lingering.

Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
In general, price of Tequila goes up with age, so añejos and extra añejos will be the most expensive and blancos the cheapest.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
Tequila goes bad with time. Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidization and evaporation diminish the Tequila quality and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
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