Euphoria 80 Absinth
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country Czech Republic
  • Distillery Euphoria
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 80%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • sweet
  • herbal
  • anise
  • coriander
  • wormwood
  • woody

Euphoria

80 Absinth (0.5l, 80%)
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Character Goatson

Yep, you read that right. 160 proof.

In 1920, Albin Hill founded Hill's Liguere in today's Czech Republic. At first, he started out as a Wine wholesaler, but he soon began making his own Spirits and Liqueurs. The business was flourishing and when Albin's son Radomil was old enough, he joined the family company. They mostly focused on Absinth and traditional Slavic Spirits, such as Alp Style Rum, Zubrovka (a type of Vodka), and herbal Liqueurs. During the communist regime, their company was confiscated, and Albin died working as a watchman. Many years later, after the Velvet Revolution, his son Radomil Hill negotiated the return of the company and Hill's Spirits were back.

Euphoria 80 Absinthe is not for the faint of heart. It features a higher alcohol content than most Absinthes, which already makes the bar high; this green potion comes at you at a whooping 160 proof (Wowzah!). Plus, there’s more thujone than usual. This is the first Czech Absinthe with such a high proof. The herbal base is comprised of grand wormwood, anise, fennel, and a selection of five herbs, including coriander, lemon balm, and orange slices. Now, obviously slow sipping is more than just a gentle suggestion when it comes to this potent green fairy, especially since the smooth taste certainly doesn’t reveal its proof.
 

  • Category Absinthe
  • Country Czech Republic
  • Distillery Euphoria
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 80%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Bright green

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Sweet and herbal.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Sweet with fresh herbs, anise, fennel, coriander, typical wormwood.

Finish
Distinct and sweet.

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Euphoria 80 Absinth taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Euphoria 80 Absinth and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • sweet
  • herbal
  • anise
  • coriander
  • wormwood
  • woody
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
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