Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • spicy
  • banana
  • cinnamon
  • melon
  • bitter
  • nutty
  • earthy
  • pepper
  • fruit

Erstwhile Mezcal

Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal (0.75l, 45%)
Price $125.99

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Character Goatson
A rare Cuishe Mezcal with big, bold flavors that deserves a place on every Mezcal-lover’s top shelf.

Brooklyn-based Erstwhile Mezcal was founded in 2017 by Yuan Ji — an antitrust lawyer with a longstanding interest in social entrepreneurship and commitment to pro bono service — and Kevin J. Brown, a purveyor of antiquarian maps. They share a passion for the small batch production of exemplary Mezcal still produced in the tiny villages and family farms of central Mexico. Their mission is to discover, curate, and connect these fine Spirits with fellow lovers of the agave arts.

As the name indicates, Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal is made from Cuishe agaves. They provide a nutty, earthy aroma over a spicy palate. The flavors are popular, but this agave is notably hard to cultivate so they must be sustainably harvested in the wild. That alone makes Cuishe Mezcals hard to find. Distilled in a copper alembic stills and bottled at 45% ABV, Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal is big on the palate with spices, peppers, and fruits.

Smartass Corner:
Cuishe agave plants (agave karminskii) are tree-like and look like short Joshua Trees with thin spears. Fairly unique is that the stalks are often roasted and fermented with the piñas.
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma is rich with a warm nuttiness and deep earthy notes.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The flavor profile is big, bold, and spicy with notes of Aleppo pepper and chipotle over roasted yellow plantains, cinnamon, clove, and bitter melon.

Finish
The finish is long, warm, and spicy.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Erstwhile Cuishe Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • spicy
  • banana
  • cinnamon
  • melon
  • bitter
  • nutty
  • earthy
  • pepper
  • fruit
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
Ratings & Reviews
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