Nuestra Soledad San Luis del Rio Mezcal
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery El Jolgorio
  • Style Joven Espadin Agave Mezcal
  • Alcohol 47.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • agave
  • smoky
  • fresh fruit
  • spicy notes
  • white pepper
  • sweet
  • lime
  • earthy
  • citrus

El Jolgorio

Nuestra Soledad San Luis del Rio Mezcal (0.75l, 47.3%)
Price $56.99

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Character Goatson
Rich and unique-flavored small-village Mezcal.

Nuestra Soledad San Luis del Rio is a small village east of Valles Centrales and with its name it pays homage to Our Lady of the Virgin of Solitude. But trust us, you won't drink this elixir alone. You'll want to share it with everyone. Every bottle of Mezcal differs from other bottles due to different methods, soils, water sources, the wood used, and the tiny magic tricks created by Maestros Mezcalero. The two masters responsible for this batch are Georgio Hernandez (also El Jolgorio) and Javier Nolasco Diaz.

This Mezcal is young and made of Espadin Agave, but the difference between every other Espadin and this one is that it grows on slopes so steep it has to be rolled down the hill after it's harvested. And the Agave ripens sooner since the region is pretty damn hot. The Agaves are roasted on mesquite fire, fermented in open air, and distilled in copper stills.

This rich-flavored Spirit may alarm you with its intense aroma, but it's really kind to the palate and you'll be happy to submerge yourself into this batch. Not literally, of course. That would look kind of stupid. Or might actually just make sense at the same time, if you get to like this Mezcal too much. 
  • Category Mezcal
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Oaxaca
  • Distillery El Jolgorio
  • Style Joven Espadin Agave Mezcal
  • Alcohol 47.3%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear.

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Citrus and spicy. 

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Pepper, spice, smoky and cream. 

Finish
Round and creamy.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Nuestra Soledad San Luis del Rio Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Nuestra Soledad San Luis del Rio Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

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  • agave
  • smoky
  • fresh fruit
  • spicy notes
  • white pepper
  • sweet
  • lime
  • earthy
  • citrus
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
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