Don Julio 70 Añejo Cristalino Tequila
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery Don Julio
  • Style Tequila Añejo
  • Maturation American white oak ex-Bourbon casks
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • agave
  • crisp
  • citrus
  • fruit
  • oak
  • vanilla
  • caramel
  • pepper
  • fresh

Don Julio

70 Añejo Cristalino Tequila (0.75l, 40%)
Price $78.99

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Character Goatson

The first Cristalino ever to be made.

When we were 17,
It was a very good year…
It wasn’t start-making-your-own-luxury-Tequila good, though. But that's exactly how good it was for one of the most famous Tequila producers – Don Julio who threw himself in the Tequila-making business at the tender age of 17 in 1942 in the Highlands of Jalisco. A perfectionist, he obsessively monitored every step of production, even personally making sure that each agave was planted far apart with enough room to grow. Using his young pioneering mind, he went on to design a lower, square-shaped Tequila bottle – he wasn’t a fan of the tall ones since you couldn’t see your friends across the table.

Considering what Don Julio was up to at 17, his 70th anniversary of Tequila wizardry had to be spectacular. We would’ve probably just organized a dinner, but Don Julio developed a whole new style of Tequila – Cristalino.

Don Julio 70 Cristalino was the first Cristalino ever made. The concept is something like: the flavors of Blanco and Añejo Tequilas but without the color. Aged for 18 months in American white oak ex-Bourbon casks, Cristalino is then charcoal filtered. This removes the color but also enhances the typical Blanco flavors of crisp agave, citrus and fruity notes and balances them with typical Añejo notes of vanilla and caramel. It’s like a Blanco and Añejo all in one complex dram.

Smartass Corner:
Cristalino Tequila was developed by Don Julio in 2011 and it originally called "Añejo Claro."
 

  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Region Jalisco
  • Distillery Don Julio
  • Style Tequila Añejo
  • Maturation American white oak ex-Bourbon casks
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Fresh crisp agave, citrus, fruity aromas

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Sweet crisp agave is balanced by oak, vanilla, and caramel.

Finish
Subtly peppery and fresh

Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Don Julio 70 Añejo Cristalino Tequila taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Don Julio 70 Añejo Cristalino Tequila and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • agave
  • crisp
  • citrus
  • fruit
  • oak
  • vanilla
  • caramel
  • pepper
  • fresh
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
Tequila is like Champagne or Cognac. It has a Denomination of Origin, meaning it can only be produced in the Jalisco State, Mexico.
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
If the Tequila bottle label does not state that it’s manufactured from 100% Blue Agave, then, by default, that Tequila is a Mixto (manufactured from 51% Blue Agave).
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.
Tequila is like Champagne or Cognac. It has a Denomination of Origin, meaning it can only be produced in the Jalisco State, Mexico.
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
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