Delamain Grande Champagne Cognac 1979
  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Delamain
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.

Delamain

Grande Champagne Cognac 1979 (0.7l, 40%)

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson

Few Cognacs are made from a single vintage. To achieve desired consistency and balance, most will blend Eaux-de-vie from several vintages and terroirs.

House Delamain certainly knows how to treat such a delicate process — after all, they are one of the oldest names in the region and one of an exclusive number of houses, authorized to produce vintage Cognacs.

Every year, small lots of these vintage Cognacs are chosen for bottling after they have fulfilled their promise of perfection. The Delamain Vintage 1979 is a wonderfully complex, rich, and rounded 40-year-old single-vineyard Cognac from Malaville in the Grande Champagne region.

Very limited edition: 1 of 238 bottles.

 

*This bottle is a collector’s item; we will not be able to entertain any refunds or exchanges.

**Individual orders are limited to one item per person, as we wish to give everyone the opportunity to participate.

***Any kind of transit damage is insured and will be reimbursed.

  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Delamain
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
The Delamain Family members included scientists, poets, writers, and of course, great Cognac makers. Jacques Delamain was a writer and a great ornithologist, while Robert Delamain the author of The History of Cognac, a still highly regarded book today amongst scholars and Cognac enthusiasts, despite being published almost a hundred years ago.
The French believe it or not, aren’t actually all that fond of Cognac. They export almost 90% of their production.
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
The Delamain Family members included scientists, poets, writers, and of course, great Cognac makers. Jacques Delamain was a writer and a great ornithologist, while Robert Delamain the author of The History of Cognac, a still highly regarded book today amongst scholars and Cognac enthusiasts, despite being published almost a hundred years ago.
The French believe it or not, aren’t actually all that fond of Cognac. They export almost 90% of their production.
There are six different wine-growing areas (crus) authorized to produce Cognac - in descending order of prestige: Grande Champagne, Petite Champagne, Borderies, Fins Bois, Bons Bois, and Bois Ordinaires.
Believe it or not, the French aren’t all that fond of Cognac. In fact, they export nearly 90% of their production.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
from