Del Maguey San Jose Rio Minas Mezcal
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • papaya
  • peach
  • floral
  • sweet
  • herbs
  • pepper
  • spicy
  • earthy
  • agave

Del Maguey

San Jose Rio Minas Mezcal (0.75l, 50%)
Price $108.99

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Character Goatson
We love a brand that just never disappoints.

Ron Cooper of Taos, New Mexico, loves Mezcal. He loves everything about it from the choice agave plants used to the local "palenques" (distilleries) brewing up this sacred elixir. "Maguey" is the Aztec word for "agave". So he established Del Maguey Single Village Mezcal in 1995, spending his days searching the back roads of Mexico discovering the small family farm distilleries making Mezcal with local flair. He bottles up their local Spirit and sells these previously unavailable, small batch artisanal releases to a grateful public.

Del Maguey is a brand that prides itself on its sustainability and focus on village producers. Taking their processes back to the ancient traditions of the Oaxaca people, Del Maguey ensures that these traditions are enshrined in their product. Sourcing their Mezcal from individual villages, they support micro-economies. This allows them to take a step back from all that mass produced Mezcal and present something unique to the market.

At Del Maguey, they like to say that you don’t find Mezcal, but it finds you. Not to get all mysterious, this was quite literally the case when they stumbled upon with this very limited edition of Vino de Mezcal series in the middle of nowhere. Made in the village of San Jose Rio Minas in the remote Northern Mixteca Alta region of Oaxaca, it’s made from Espadin and Arroqueño maguey. This variety needs 8-10 years to reach maturity at about 4855 feet. Roasted for 3-4 days and fermented for 10-15 days, spring water is then added to the mix and it's finally bottled at 100 proof. 96 points for this one at the 2019 Ultimate Spirits Challenge. 
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Bright and sweet. Papaya and ripe peaches.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Lightly sweet and very floral.

Finish
Refreshing with pepper and herbal notes.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Del Maguey San Jose Rio Minas Mezcal taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Del Maguey San Jose Rio Minas Mezcal and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

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  • papaya
  • peach
  • floral
  • sweet
  • herbs
  • pepper
  • spicy
  • earthy
  • agave
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Founder Ron Cooper was one of the pioneering members of the Light and Space art scene in the 1960s. He calls Del Maguey “liquid art”.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Founder Ron Cooper was one of the pioneering members of the Light and Space art scene in the 1960s. He calls Del Maguey “liquid art”.
Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.
All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
While Mezcal is produced all across Mexico, most of the Mezcal we see is produced in the state of Oaxaca. Interestingly, over 70% of Mezcal is made from the Espadín agave—even though more than 20 types of agave are used to make Mezcal.

Espadín. That word means “sword” in Spanish because the leaves look like a mass of swords projecting out of the plant. Espadín Mezcals are most common because it has been the easiest agave to cultivate.

All Tequila is Mezcal, but not all Mezcal is Tequila.
Ratings & Reviews
from From the flaviar times