Damoiseau VSOP Rhum Vieux Agricole
  • Category Rum
  • Country Guadeloupe
  • Region Caribbean
  • Distillery Damoiseau
  • Style Caribbean Rhum
  • Alcohol 42%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • bitter
  • sweet
  • spicy
  • dry
  • dark chocolate
  • cinnamon
  • brown sugar
  • raisin
  • charred

Damoiseau

VSOP Rhum Vieux Agricole (0.75l, 42%)

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Character Goatson
From freshly squeezed sugarcane juice.

Based in the sunny Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, Damoiseau is situated in the best place to make some very fine Rhum Agricole. Rhum differs from Rum in that it is made from sugar cane juice rather than molasses. The tradition of making Rhum has been on the island for centuries and Damoiseau are the biggest producers found here. The Bellevue Distillery was bought by the Damiouseau family in 1942, and remains in the family to this day.
 
Damoiseau’s VSOP Rhum is distilled from the finest sugar cane Guadeloupe has to offer. It is then matured in charred ex-Bourbon casks for a minimum of four years. This Rhum has a sweet and complex flavour profile, with a great spiciness and gentle bitter coffee taste that really emphasises the saccharine over tones.

  • Category Rum
  • Country Guadeloupe
  • Region Caribbean
  • Distillery Damoiseau
  • Style Caribbean Rhum
  • Alcohol 42%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Light amber mahogany
 
Smell / Nose / Aroma
Thick caramel and vanilla with cloves and cinnamon
 
Flavor / Taste / Palate
Sweet and spicy, bitter dark chocolate and espresso with warming brown sugar and spices, slight fruitiness, dried raisins and clementines 
 
Finish
Dry and long, quite sweet
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Damoiseau VSOP Rhum Vieux Agricole taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Damoiseau VSOP Rhum Vieux Agricole and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • bitter
  • sweet
  • spicy
  • dry
  • dark chocolate
  • cinnamon
  • brown sugar
  • raisin
  • charred
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum (usually) comes from molasses, the sweet and syrupy residue of refining sugarcane into sugar. Molasses is over 50% sugar, but it also contains significant amounts of minerals and other trace elements, contributing to the final flavor.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Common Rum classifications: White, Golden or Amber, Dark, Spiced, Añejo and Age-Dated Rums.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
Rum (usually) comes from molasses, the sweet and syrupy residue of refining sugarcane into sugar. Molasses is over 50% sugar, but it also contains significant amounts of minerals and other trace elements, contributing to the final flavor.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Common Rum classifications: White, Golden or Amber, Dark, Spiced, Añejo and Age-Dated Rums.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
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