Corsair Red Absinthe
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Corsair
  • Age NAS
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 56%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • hibiscus
  • floral
  • wormwood
  • citrus
  • bitter
  • dry
  • pepper
  • beer
  • anise

Corsair

Red Absinthe (0.75l, 56%)
Price $61.99

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Character Goatson
A unique perception of what an Absinthe should be.

Andrew Webber and Darek Bell own and run the Corsair Artisan Distillery located in Bowling Green, Kentucky and Nashville, Tennessee. Friends since childhood, Adrew and Darek began as beer brewers out of their garage and later hit a snag while working on a prototype bio-diesel plant. Soon after they opened up Corsair, a distillery dedicated to producing exquisite small-batch spirits, and relentless experimentation, they realized that producing Whiskey would be a lot more fun.

The Corsair Red Absinthe has a truly unique perception of what an Absinthe should be. Bringing together traditional production methods with unorthodox ingredients like citrus, tarragon and red Hibiscus flowers makes this Absinthe really offbeat and something you have to get your hands on. Looks like the Green Fairy can be Red also!?  
 
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Corsair
  • Age NAS
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 56%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Cream red.
 
Smell / Nose / Aroma
A balanced aroma of hibiscus, wormwood and slightly floral scents.
 
Flavor / Taste / Palate
Silky mouthfeel of dry, peppery and floral palate.
 
Finish 
A dry, bitter long lasting sensation.
 
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Corsair Red Absinthe taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Corsair Red Absinthe and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • hibiscus
  • floral
  • wormwood
  • citrus
  • bitter
  • dry
  • pepper
  • beer
  • anise
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Corsair now operates three distilleries after adding a second Nashville location in 2015.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Corsair now operates three distilleries after adding a second Nashville location in 2015.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
from From the flaviar times