Coppersea Excelsior Straight Bourbon Whisky
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region New York
  • Distillery Coppersea
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whisky
  • Maturation New York casks
  • Alcohol 48%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • caramel
  • peach
  • black pepper
  • spicy
  • bonfire
  • woody
  • vanilla
  • grain
  • oak

Coppersea

Excelsior Straight Bourbon Whisky (0.75l, 48%)

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson
An old-school pre-Prohibition Bourbon from Upstate New York.

Now, this Whisky’s name is loaded with images of yesteryear and symbolism, so let’s unwrap this verbiage first: Coppersea takes us back to the 19th Century when the Hudson Valley in New York was a constellation of copper stills that churned gallons of Spirit before the wicked times of Prohibition. The know-how and tradition that sprung from that sea of copper, is still present today. Agnus MacDonald, the owner and master distiller at Coppersea, says they want to keep it primitive when it comes to Whiskey production. But their philosophy isn’t primitive – that’s when the word excelsior comes in: it’s an Empire State motto and it means "ever upward" in some dead language. Now, Excelsior Straight Bourbon is 100% New York, which means you might hear Stanley Turrentine, cab drivers honking and someone shouting at you to get out of their way for some reason, when you open the bottle.

Except the Coppersea Distillery is actually a farm upstate, so you should hear rivers, bees, and someone shouting at you to get out of their way. This decadent Bourbon is made in-house with grain that grows nearby. Talk about locally produced free-range Whisky, right? Even the casks are made of New York oak and this Whiskey is supposed to be the first one to mature in such oak after the Prohibition. By the way: why is locally sourced grain so important? Glad you asked! It's all about controlled sprouting, converting starch into sugars and enzymes, but the most crucial thing here is the result: a uniquely redolent Whisky with fresh and full flavor and complexity that comes from a process called direct firing (skip the steam, fire the still directly, like in the good ole days). 
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Region New York
  • Distillery Coppersea
  • Style Straight Bourbon Whisky
  • Maturation New York casks
  • Alcohol 48%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Golden

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Vanilla, campfire wood, caramel. 

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Caramel, black pepper, vanilla, peaches. 

Finish
Medium, aromatic, lingering spices.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Coppersea Excelsior Straight Bourbon Whisky taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Coppersea Excelsior Straight Bourbon Whisky and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • caramel
  • peach
  • black pepper
  • spicy
  • bonfire
  • woody
  • vanilla
  • grain
  • oak
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
Straight Bourbon must be matured for at least 2 years. If a bottle has no age statement, it’s at least 4 years old.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon Is a ''new barrel Spirit'': One of the legal requirements for Bourbon is that it only be aged in brand new oak charred barrels.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
Straight Bourbon must be matured for at least 2 years. If a bottle has no age statement, it’s at least 4 years old.
"Remember that iconic poster from World War II showing Rosie the Riveter as a patriotic American woman doing her part for the war effort? Well, hundreds of businesses did their part too, and the Bourbon distillers stepped right up with ‘em.

Distilleries all over Kentucky and Tennessee were re-tooled to distill fuel alcohol and ferment penicillin cultures to treat wounded soldiers."
from