Copper & Kings Absinthe Alembic Blanche
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Copper & Kings
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 65%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • apple
  • fruit
  • liquorice
  • raisin
  • candied
  • botanicals
  • wormwood
  • anise
  • orange peel

Copper & Kings

Absinthe Alembic Blanche (0.75l, 65%)
Oooops. This bottle is not available yet.
Add it to your wishlist and we will let you know once we get it.

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson
Mysterious Absinthe for jazzy evenings.

Up in the northern part of Louisville, KY, right next to the Ohio River and a shout away from Indiana, there's a picturesque neighborhood called Butchertown. It used to be home to butchers, brawlers and brewers, today it houses artists, artisans and distillers. One of them is a bold distillery of Copper & King American Brandy Company. They produce American Brandy, Absinthe and Gin.

Now, when it comes to Absinthe, or as poetic types call it, The Green Fairy, there's a lot of scaremongering that it's a psychoactive drug and hallucinogen. As much as it would be fun, it also isn't true, and many famous writers loved the potion: Hemingway, Joyce, Verlaine, Proust, etc. Copper & Kings bring a wonderful Absinthe expression carefully concocted by combining classic botanicals such as anis, fennel and wormwood. This non-chill filtered emerald beauty with an authentic herbaceous nose and natural pastoral flavors will take you to smoke-filled French bars with jazz and flappers. Maybe you'll write the next American novel while sipping on it. Oh, and screw the consumption rules. Have this potion on rocks, as a julep, or in wonderful cocktails such as Buck Rogers, Chrysanthemum, or Sazerac. 
  • Category Absinthe
  • Country United States
  • Region Kentucky
  • Distillery Copper & Kings
  • Style Absinthe
  • Alcohol 65%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Clear.

Nose / Aroma / Smell
Intense candied licorice notes.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
Fruit flavors with a slight note of apples and golden raisins.

Finish 
Smooth and mellow.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Copper & Kings Absinthe Alembic Blanche taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Copper & Kings Absinthe Alembic Blanche and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • apple
  • fruit
  • liquorice
  • raisin
  • candied
  • botanicals
  • wormwood
  • anise
  • orange peel
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
At the Copper & Kings they paint their barrelheads orange.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
They currently age their Absinthe in juniper barrels from Serbia.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
At the Copper & Kings they paint their barrelheads orange.
Ready for some weird science? When you add a few drops of water to clear green Absinthe, it turns milky white. Scientists call it the "ouzo effect," whic happens when the unique characteristics of anethole (the essential oil responsible for anise flavor), high-proof ethanol and water are mixed.
They currently age their Absinthe in juniper barrels from Serbia.
The nickname, "The Green Fairy," is the English translation of La Fee Verte, the affectionate French nickname given to the popular drink in the 19th century. Though Absinthe is not a hallucinogen, the Green Fairy was representative of the metaphorical concept of the artistic enlightenment and exploration, of poetic inspiration, of a freer state of mind, of new ideas, of a changing social order.
Absinthe was actually invented by a French doctor named Pierre Ordinaire. He invented absinthe by distilling wormwood and several other herbs into an alcoholic base. Although this may seem strange in today's modern world of medicine, at the time it was considered a viable remedy for patients with various ailments.
from