Château de Léberon Solera 2001 Armagnac
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • figs
  • fragrant
  • oak
  • spicy
  • cake
  • rancio
  • cedarwood
  • apricot
  • sweet

Château de Léberon

Solera 2001 Armagnac (0.7l, 43.2%)
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Character Goatson
A complex, aromatic, and flavorful Armagnac aged Solera-style.

Château Léberon was originally a medieval fortress built in the fourteenth century. Being in the southwest of France, it was largely spared the ravages of World War and survive to become a stately mansion when purchased by Osmin Rozès in 1939. After restoring the home, he and his children planted grape vines — including Ugni Blanc and Colombard. A few of those original vine survive to this day, but the average age of the vines in more than forty years. The family produces a range of highly-prized, vintage Armagnacs.

Château de Léberon Solera 2001 Armagnac is a bit of a departure for Chateau Léberon. Most of their offerings are specific vintages — reflecting the harvest, weather, and terroir of a single year. This might be considered a more whimsical offering, and the label art reflects this. It is aged by the Solera method, indicating that the Spirit has parts far older than reflected on the label and delivering a rich, complex fragrance and palate. As with all Armagnacs from Chateau Léberon, there are no added colors, flavors, sugars, or anything else to despoil the experience.


Smartass Corner:
It is rare for Solera aging to be used on Armagnac. It is most commonly used for fortified Wines like Sherry and Port, and in better Rums and Single Malt Whiskies.
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Deep Mahogany

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aroma displace complexity and finesse with notes of rancio and cedar wood combined with stewed apricot.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The palate leans toward fig, sultana, and quince with heathy doses of warm oak and spice cake.

Finish
The finish is long and lingering with a full after-aroma.
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What does Château de Léberon Solera 2001 Armagnac taste like?

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  • figs
  • fragrant
  • oak
  • spicy
  • cake
  • rancio
  • cedarwood
  • apricot
  • sweet
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
To delve even deeper with Cognac and Armagnac, they live about 180 miles apart, so they're practically neighbours. Cognac is mostly made from one sort of grape, while Armagnac loves variety. The most interesting difference is their PR: Armagnac is one of the oldest Spirits on the planet and it was rarely exported. Cognac, on the other hand, was the export blockbuster with good marketing. It even had Napoleon III as its poster boy, who made sure Cognac was sold in every medieval supermarket.
If we’re calling dibs on who gets first-born privileges, Armagnac edges out Cognac. The Spirit is the oldest type of Brandy in France, with documented distillation dating back to the early 15th century.
The best way to enjoy a Calvados or Cognac is in a balloon-shaped snifter. Armagnac? Try a Champagne flute or a tulip-style glass instead.
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Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
To delve even deeper with Cognac and Armagnac, they live about 180 miles apart, so they're practically neighbours. Cognac is mostly made from one sort of grape, while Armagnac loves variety. The most interesting difference is their PR: Armagnac is one of the oldest Spirits on the planet and it was rarely exported. Cognac, on the other hand, was the export blockbuster with good marketing. It even had Napoleon III as its poster boy, who made sure Cognac was sold in every medieval supermarket.
If we’re calling dibs on who gets first-born privileges, Armagnac edges out Cognac. The Spirit is the oldest type of Brandy in France, with documented distillation dating back to the early 15th century.
The best way to enjoy a Calvados or Cognac is in a balloon-shaped snifter. Armagnac? Try a Champagne flute or a tulip-style glass instead.
from From the flaviar times