Camus Ile de Re Cliffside Cellar
  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Camus
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • smoky
  • sweet
  • citrus
  • floral
  • phenols
  • grape
  • vanilla
  • spicy
  • rancio

Camus

Ile de Re Cliffside Cellar (0.7l, 40%)
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Character Goatson
The Maritime One.
 
In 1863 Jean-Baptiste Camus founding a collective of producers that produced high quality Cognac under the name La Grande Marque. The business flourished and soon enough Jean-Baptiste bought out his partners to establish his own Cognac house, Camus La Grande Marque. The name gained fame, they even started supplying the court of the Russian Tsar Nicolas II.
 
Cherishing this 150 year-old tradition, the 5th generation of the family remains true to the heritage of providing different and intriguing Cognacs from all the Terroirs. Bois Ordinaires is the smallest of the six crus and the vicinity of the sea brings it a different character, full of fruitiness which, in the past, was overlooked but had now obtained recognition with new approaches of making Cognac.
 
Camus Ile de Re Cliffside Cellar is unique in the World of Cognac. For one, the grapes have a higher iodine content because of the vicinity of the sea, and secondly, the maturation uniquely occurs on an island encircled by the Atlantic. This is a one-and-only infusion broadening the Cognac universe. 
 
  • Category Cognac
  • Country France
  • Region Cognac
  • Distillery Camus
  • Style Cognac
  • Alcohol 40%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Camus Ile de Re Cliffside Cellar taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Camus Ile de Re Cliffside Cellar and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • smoky
  • sweet
  • citrus
  • floral
  • phenols
  • grape
  • vanilla
  • spicy
  • rancio
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Camus have their own brand of sustainable, high-altitude-grown, small scale… Coffee. Sourced from South and Central America, the beans undergo a similar master-blender type of treatment that Camus Cognac blenders have been using for generations.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
The French believe it or not, aren’t actually all that fond of Cognac. They export almost 90% of their production.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
Cognac, named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy (distilled wine). It is only produced in the wine-growing region surrounding this town. Cognac must be made from specified grapes, be twice distilled in copper pot stills, and be aged at least two years in French oak barrels. Most Cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement.
There are three primary grades of Cognac recognized by law: V.S., V.S.O.P., and X.O, but we also know Napoléon, XXO, and Hors d'âge.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Camus have their own brand of sustainable, high-altitude-grown, small scale… Coffee. Sourced from South and Central America, the beans undergo a similar master-blender type of treatment that Camus Cognac blenders have been using for generations.
Rancio is a highly desirable nutty flavor usually found in extra-aged fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira, Marsala …) and fruit-based Spirits, namely Cognacs, Calvados, and Armagnac. It appears in Cognac after roughly 10 years of maturing in oak casks, becoming more intense over the years.
The French believe it or not, aren’t actually all that fond of Cognac. They export almost 90% of their production.
The wine used for Cognac is very dry, acidic, and thin but excellent for distillation and aging.
Cognac, named after the town of Cognac in France, is a variety of brandy (distilled wine). It is only produced in the wine-growing region surrounding this town. Cognac must be made from specified grapes, be twice distilled in copper pot stills, and be aged at least two years in French oak barrels. Most Cognacs are aged considerably longer than the minimum legal requirement.
There are three primary grades of Cognac recognized by law: V.S., V.S.O.P., and X.O, but we also know Napoléon, XXO, and Hors d'âge.
Ratings & Reviews
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