Breaker Port Barrel Finish Bourbon Whisky
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Distillery Breaker
  • Age NAS
  • Style Bourbon Whisky
  • Maturation Finished in first-fill Port casks
  • Alcohol 45%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • grape
  • molasses
  • leather
  • maple
  • oily
  • cinnamon
  • fruit
  • fire
  • pecan

Breaker

Port Barrel Finish Bourbon Whisky (0.75l, 45%)
Price $59.99

Flaviar Members get free shipping on qualifying orders.

Join the club
Character Goatson
A bright, fruit-forward Bourbon from California’s Wine countryside.

Steve Gertman began his working life in the production departments of car-themed TV shows, including Top Gear, among others. But on a trip to Scotland, he fell in love with Whisky — as a lot of us have. Instead of dreaming, he put his passions into motion and founded the first legal distillery in Santa Barbara County since Prohibition — opening his distilling doors in 2013. Business has been good, to say the least. His Ascendant Spirits Distillery has grown steadily and now offers a range of Breaker Bourbons, three Whiskies, four Vodkas, and a Gin.

When you first look at Breaker Port Barrel Finish Bourbon you are struck by the brilliant rose color of the Bourbon. It’s almost like they forgot to empty the Port Wine casks before they put the Bourbon in. The sourced Spirit is fully matured, a sweeter profile Bourbon finished in first-fill Port casks, yielding a fruit-forward Bourbon unlike any we’ve tasted before with a bright, garnet hue. Call it the Rosé of Bourbons… or Bourbon in the new California style.

Smartass Corner:
The Breaker Bourbon line gets it name from the local surfing waves — breakers — rolling just off the coast of El Capitan beach. 
  • Category Bourbon
  • Country United States
  • Distillery Breaker
  • Age NAS
  • Style Bourbon Whisky
  • Maturation Finished in first-fill Port casks
  • Alcohol 45%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Garnet-amber

Nose / Aroma / Smell
On the nose you find dancing and mingling aromas of grape, demerara sugar, raw grains, cinnamon, and maple.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The thick mouthfeel has a flavor-blast of molasses, pecans, concord grape, worn leather, and a bit of heat.

Finish
The finish is medium length, sweet, and a bit oily.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Breaker Port Barrel Finish Bourbon Whisky taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Breaker Port Barrel Finish Bourbon Whisky and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • grape
  • molasses
  • leather
  • maple
  • oily
  • cinnamon
  • fruit
  • fire
  • pecan
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Bourbon was declared "The Official Spirit of America" by an Act of Congress signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Sure, Kentucky gets all the press when it comes to Bourbon. And with good reason—nearly 95% of it is produced there. But Bourbon can be made anywhere as long as it's within the United States. Just ask states with budding distilleries like Illinois and New York.
At any given time, there are more barrels of Bourbon in Kentucky than there are people. The population of the Bluegrass State is about 4.4 million. Today there are more than 5 million barrels of Bourbon sitting in the rick-houses of that Old Kentucky Home. That’s nearly 300 bottles of Bourbon per person, or about 60 gallons each.
Whisky or Whiskey? The spelling differs geographically. In Scotland, Japan, and some other parts of the world, distilleries usually spell it Whisky; in Ireland and the USA, they spell it Whiskey.
Bourbon only needs to be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called Bourbon. Fresh from the still and unaged Bourbon is called a White Dog. Recently, many of the larger distillers have started packaging this harsh, clear grain spirit for sale.
Bourbon rules refer to manufacturing methods rather than location. Bourbon must be matured in new and charred American white oak casks for at least 2 years. If the bottle has no age statement, the Bourbon is at least 4 years old. No coloring or flavoring of any type is allowed, and the mash bill must contain at least 51% corn.
Bourbon was declared "The Official Spirit of America" by an Act of Congress signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964.
from From the flaviar times