Lawley's New England Small Batch Dark Rum
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • toffee
  • mint
  • toasted oak
  • vanilla
  • butterscotch
  • banana
  • spicy
  • melon
  • slightly sweet

Boston Harbor Distillery

Lawley's New England Small Batch Dark Rum (0.7l, 40%)
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Character Goatson
A nicely complex Dark Rum that is vatted for eight weeks with barrel staves for a smoother, more flavorful profile.

Rhonda Kallman is a sharp, savvy businesswoman. She was a founding partner of The Boston Beer Company — famous for their Samuel Adams Boston Lager and Angry Orchard Hard Cider, among other beverages. She went on to found New Century Brewing. Her story was even featured in the 2009 movie "Beer Wars." And then in 2011 she founded Boston Harbor Distillery, building out her stills in a historic 1859 brick warehouse in the Harbor District where the team makes Whiskey, Rum, Liqueurs, and other Spirits.

The second entry in Boston Harbor Distillery’s pursuit of Rum greatness is Lawley's New England Small Batch Dark Rum. The edition starts with the same process as their White Rum. That means 100% molasses and copper pot distillation with narrow "heart" cuts of the Spirit. This Dark Rum is different because it is vatted. The Spirit is placed into large wooden vats along with loose staves, heads, and chimes from their used barrel inventory. The Rum rests there for eight full weeks, now imparted with vanilla and wood spice notes.

Smartass Corner:
At one time there were sixty-three distilleries in Massachusetts and thirty more in Rhode Island.
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Ruddy Gold

Nose / Aroma / Smell
On the nose, look for notes of brittle toffee, menthol, and a bit of melon.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The flavors are nicely complex, starting with a light butterscotch note that leads to toasted oak, vanilla, a hint of banana, and a light spice.

Finish
The finish is long and lightly sweet.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Lawley's New England Small Batch Dark Rum taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Lawley's New England Small Batch Dark Rum and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • toffee
  • mint
  • toasted oak
  • vanilla
  • butterscotch
  • banana
  • spicy
  • melon
  • slightly sweet
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
If the center of our galaxy had a signature scent, it would be Rum. Yup, astronomers studying a giant cloud in the Milky Way found a substance called ethyl formate, a chemical that smells suspiciously like Rum.
You might find Rum masquerading itself under other nom de plumes, like Ron, Rom and Rhum.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
A little bit of etymology; nobody really knows where the word Rum comes from. The most popular suggestions are Rum (the Romani word for 'potent'), Rumbullion (an uproar), Saccharum (sugar in Latin), and Rummer (a Dutch drinking glass).
Rum is a sugar cane based spirit, primarily made in the Caribbean and Latin America, but you can really find Rum in many corners of the world.
Rum used to be accepted as a form of currency in Europe and Australia, a practice we should probably bring back into fashion.
from From the flaviar times