The Ardmore 12 YO Port Wood Finish
  • Category Scotch
  • Country Scotland
  • Region Speyside
  • Distillery Ardmore
  • Age 12 Year Old
  • Style Single Malt Whisky
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • smoky
  • walnut
  • apple
  • honey
  • peaty
  • sweet
  • port
  • walnuts
  • caramel

Ardmore

The 12 YO Port Wood Finish (0.7l, 46%)

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Character Goatson

The Ardmore 12 Year Port Wood feels like drinking a light, sweet, Highland Single Malt on the patio of a bar in Havana. 
 
Adam Teacher founded Ardmore Distillery in 1898 in the Highlands of Aberdeenshire to fill a specific need. His father, William Teacher, needed a steady supply of Whisky to support their famous blend — Theacher’s Highland Cream. Beam Suntory owns them these days, and until very recently, have treated this fine producer as a "blender’s distillery." But those corporate mucky-mucks have wised up and have turned their attention to their fine ability to produce fine, premium Spirits on their own. 
 
One of the things that makes Ardmore so unique is that their malt is one of the very few Highlanders to use peat smoke. That alone is a reason to celebrate their brand and character. They will continue to be a primary contributor to the blended Whisky market, but we are all anticipating a full range of single malt offerings on the come. Just in the last year, they have issued their Ardmore Legacy Single Malt, a triple-wood, and a brand new Port wood finish. 
 
Everything about this new offering makes total sense. Let’s start with the math … A unique, Highland Single Malt producer with a 118-year history; plus initial 10 years of aging in American white oak ex-Bourbon casks; plus 2 additional years aging in rich, European Port half-pipes; plus 46% ABV and NO chill-filtering; equals… well you know what all that means. It means tasty! 
 
We know it tastes GOOD, but what does it taste LIKE? Remember that this is not your average Highlander… it has a wee bit of smoke. If you have had Balvenie’s Port Wood Finish, then think of The Ardmore 12 Year Port Wood as like drinking that Balvenie on the patio of a Havana cigar bar. It is crisp and lightly sweet with a hint of aromatic smoke lingering in the background. But no matter what, you owe it to yourself to sample this special dram and see for yourself. 

  • Category Scotch
  • Country Scotland
  • Region Speyside
  • Distillery Ardmore
  • Age 12 Year Old
  • Style Single Malt Whisky
  • Alcohol 46%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Worn Copper  
 
Nose / Aroma / Smell
A wisp of smoke with honey apples.    
 
Flavor / Taste / Palate
Apples again, with honey and a hint of walnut smoke.

Finish
The finish is medium long with smoky notes.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does The Ardmore 12 YO Port Wood Finish taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in The Ardmore 12 YO Port Wood Finish and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • smoky
  • walnut
  • apple
  • honey
  • peaty
  • sweet
  • port
  • walnuts
  • caramel
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Scotch Whisky is seldom aged in new barrels. Bourbon and Tennessee Whiskey casks are usually used for maturation. In addition to that, Whisky is often matured or finished in various wine casks such as Sherry or Port.
Single malt stands for around 10% of the Scotch market. This is a malt containing only one grain, legally required to be barley in Scotland, and made at a single distillery.

A blended Scotch is a combination of different malts from different distilleries. It is typically made from grain Whisky but does include malt Whisky to give it a more complex body.
First-class Whiskies are taxed not only by the state but also by the angels. This refers to the 4% of Whisky that evaporates from the barrels every year, a phenomenon known as the angel’s share.
Can Scotch go bad? Technically, an unopened bottle of Scotch can last forever. Air is the only true evil to Whisky; once the liquid is oxidized it is no longer immortal. After opening, as long as you store your Whisky in a cool, dry place, it will last another 5 years.
Is Scotch always Scottish? What do you think? Yes. The answer is yes.
Whisky distilling goes way back to 1494 when the first recorded batch was made by a posse of monks who acquired about 60 gallons of barley and decided to turn it into "aqua vitae". They created the first 1,500 bottles of Scotch in History.
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Scotch Whisky is seldom aged in new barrels. Bourbon and Tennessee Whiskey casks are usually used for maturation. In addition to that, Whisky is often matured or finished in various wine casks such as Sherry or Port.
Single malt stands for around 10% of the Scotch market. This is a malt containing only one grain, legally required to be barley in Scotland, and made at a single distillery.

A blended Scotch is a combination of different malts from different distilleries. It is typically made from grain Whisky but does include malt Whisky to give it a more complex body.
First-class Whiskies are taxed not only by the state but also by the angels. This refers to the 4% of Whisky that evaporates from the barrels every year, a phenomenon known as the angel’s share.
Can Scotch go bad? Technically, an unopened bottle of Scotch can last forever. Air is the only true evil to Whisky; once the liquid is oxidized it is no longer immortal. After opening, as long as you store your Whisky in a cool, dry place, it will last another 5 years.
Is Scotch always Scottish? What do you think? Yes. The answer is yes.
Whisky distilling goes way back to 1494 when the first recorded batch was made by a posse of monks who acquired about 60 gallons of barley and decided to turn it into "aqua vitae". They created the first 1,500 bottles of Scotch in History.
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