Agavero Original Tequila Liqueur
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Distillery Cuervo La Rojena
  • Age NAS
  • Style Tequila Liqueur
  • Maturation Medium-char French Limousin oak
  • Alcohol 32%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
  • herbs
  • floral
  • chamomile
  • oak
  • anise
  • fragrant
  • agave
  • sweet
  • sage

Agavero

Original Tequila Liqueur (0.5l, 32%)
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Character Goatson
A luscious herbal and floral Tequila liqueur that reflects the best.

Proximo Spirits is the exclusive importer for Agavera Camichines Distillers, located in the heart of Tequila country. The company was originally founded on the 1800 Tequila brand and they have greatly expanded over the last few years. They produce a wide range of Tequilas and Teauila-based beverages and have branched out into a broader range of Vodka, Gins, and even Whiskey.

Agavero Tequila Liqueur was invented by Tequila master Lazaro Gallardo in 1857 just for his friends and special occasions — keeping the simple recipe a secret. But demand became strong, so he brought his creation into commercial production. It’s made from a select blend of 100% blue agave añejo and reposado Tequilas that have been exclusively aged in new, medium-char French Limousin oak barrels, just like fine Cognac. Those Tequilas are blended and re-barreled with infused Damiana blossoms. It’s totally unique and emerges from the second casks as a distinctly Mexican spirit with a fragrant aroma and downright luscious texture.

Smartass corner: 
Damiana are small yellow blossoms that come from a native shrub — Turnera Diffusa. The flowers have been used in folk medicine across Central and South America for millennia and have a spicy-chamomile-like aroma.
  • Category Tequila
  • Country Mexico
  • Distillery Cuervo La Rojena
  • Age NAS
  • Style Tequila Liqueur
  • Maturation Medium-char French Limousin oak
  • Alcohol 32%
California residents: Click here for Proposition 65 WARNING.
Appearance / Color
Copper.

Nose / Aroma / Smell
The aromas are unique and pleasant with chamomile, anise, oak, and wet sage.

Flavor / Taste / Palate
The palate is rich and luscious in mouth-feel with complex herbal and floral notes.

Finish
The finish is smooth, subtle, and soothing with notes of a fresh hewn field after a rainstorm.
Flavor Spiral TM
About the Flavor Spiral
What does Agavero Original Tequila Liqueur taste like?

The Flavor Spiral™ shows the most common flavors that you'll taste in Agavero Original Tequila Liqueur and gives you a chance to have a taste of it before actually tasting it.

We invented Flavor Spiral™ here at Flaviar to get all your senses involved in tasting drinks and, frankly, because we think that classic tasting notes are boring.

Back to flavor spiral
  • herbs
  • floral
  • chamomile
  • oak
  • anise
  • fragrant
  • agave
  • sweet
  • sage
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
The strongest Tequila available for sale clocks in at 75% ABV (150 proof). This shouldn’t come as a surprise, but drinking huge amounts of this spirit is likely te-quil-a.
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
Similar drinks
Dog Dogson's Smartass corner
Character Dogson
Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged tequila.
Need a salt shaker and lime? Nah. The Mexicans take their Tequila neat and prefer to leave the lime and salt for their margaritas. Wouldn’t be a bad idea to follow suit.

Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.

Tequila labeled Gold (Oro) is your indicator (i.e., red flag) that you’re dealing with a mixto Tequila - unaged silver Tequila that has been colored and flavored with caramel to give the appearance of aged Tequila.
The strongest Tequila available for sale clocks in at 75% ABV (150 proof). This shouldn’t come as a surprise, but drinking huge amounts of this spirit is likely te-quil-a.
Tequila goes bad with time! Once you open a bottle of Tequila, you better be in the mood to drink it. Generally, you have one to two months before oxidation and evaporation diminish the quality of the Tequila and destroy the Agave flavor profile.
Tequila is made from one type of agave, Blue agave. Each of these plants takes at least 6 years, more likely a year or two longer to mature.
There are over 136 species of Agave. For Tequila to be officially called “Tequila,” it must be comprised of at least 51% of the Blue Weber Agave species.
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